The Washington University Department of Psychiatry history timeline was created with the support of the Department of Psychiatry in the fall of 2007 by Dr. Eugene Rubin, Vice Chair for Education. This project is intended to help preserve some of our Department’s history as well as provide a longitudinal perspective of the Department for those interested in gaining such a perspective. The Vice Chair for Education and the Head of the Department are responsible for updates and potential expansions of the time line. As is true with this sort of project, there may be some errors despite every attempt for accuracy. Special thanks to Dr. Richard Hudgens for sharing information from his earlier historical reviews of the Department. Also, thanks to Paul Anderson, Ph.D., Associate Professor and Archivist, and Philip Skroska, visual and graphic archives, for their assistance. This time line history is the property of the Department of Psychiatry, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine and is protected by copyright laws (October, 2007).

 

1913: Dr. Malcolm Bliss is one of the first physicians to lecture on psychiatry at Washington University Medical School.

Dr. Malcolm Bliss was a lecturer at the medical  school from 1898 to1915. He was both a dentist and a physician. Among his many civic activities, he played a leading role in the passage of the bond issue that resulted in the building of Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute.

Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute opened in 1938 as a hospital in the St. Louis City hospital system. Washington University psychiatry professor Dr. George Ulett initiated clinical research at Bliss in the 1950s. Dr. Ulett later became director of Missouri’s Division of Mental Disease. In 1964, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center became part of Missouri’s mental health system. In 1991, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center closed. A section of St. Louis State Hospital was temporarily set up to serve patients formerly treated at Malcolm Bliss. In 1996, patients were transferred to a newly built state facility, Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center. Washington University psychiatry residents and medical students rotated at these hospitals throughout much of their history until most inpatient services were discontinued in 2011.

1914: Executive faculty system is developed at the medical school

During the decade following the Flexner report, the executive faculty assumed major responsibilities in running the Medical School. Teamwork and consensus building among the department heads became essential. The department heads have major roles in selecting new department heads. This executive faculty system encourages the selection of clinical department heads who are excellent scientists, excellent clinicians, and team players. This model of leadership has likely had an impact on the types of individuals who have been chosen to run the Departments of Neuropsychiatry (1938-1963) and Psychiatry (1963 – current). For a list of Psychiatry Department Heads, click here.

1918: First head of neurology and psychiatry

Dr. Sidney Schwab becomes Head of the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry. This “department” was a subdepartment of the Department of Medicine.

From 1918 until 1938, Dr. Sidney Schwab played a major role in teaching both neurology and psychiatry. He was a practicing clinician and a lecturer. 

Until 1938, the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry was part of the Department of Medicine. In 1938, an independent Department of Neuropsychiatry was created and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation for 6 years via two grants of three years each. In 1955, the Department of Neuropsychiatry was renamed the Department of Psychiatry and Neurology. In 1963, an independent Department of Psychiatry and an independent Department of Neurology were created.

1938: Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute opens as a facility in the St. Louis City hospital system.

Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute opened in 1938 as a hospital in the St. Louis City hospital system. Washington University psychiatry professor Dr. George Ulett initiated clinical research at Bliss in the 1950s. Dr. Ulett later became director of Missouri’s Division of Mental Disease. In 1964, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center became part of Missouri’s mental health system. In 1991, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center closed. A section of St. Louis State Hospital was temporarily set up to serve patients formerly treated at Malcolm Bliss. In 1996, patients were transferred to a newly built state facility, Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center. Washington University psychiatry residents and medical students rotated at these hospitals throughout much of their history until most inpatient services were discontinued in 2011.

1938: The Department of Neuropsychiatry is born as an independent department at Washington University. Drs. Rioch, Whitehorn, and Jacobsen have leadership roles in the new Department.

Until 1938, the Department of Neurology and Psychiatry was part of the Department of Medicine. In 1938, an independent Department of Neuropsychiatry was created and supported by the Rockefeller Foundation for 6 years via two grants of three years each.  In 1955, the Department of Neuropsychiatry was renamed the Department of Psychiatry and Neurology. In 1963, an independent Department of Psychiatry and an independent Department of Neurology were created.

Dr. Rioch was appointed the administrative head of the Department of Neuropsychiatry. He worked at the Medical School from 1938 until about 1943 at which time he left for a research position at the Chestnut Lodge. Dr. Whitehorn was a professor of psychiatry. He left in 1941 to take the Adolph Meyer Chair at Johns Hopkins. Dr. Jacobsen eventually left the University to become Dean of the Graduate School at the University of Iowa. For a list of Psychiatry Department Heads, click here.

1941: Wallace and Lucille Renard invest in the Department.

Between 1941 and 1949, Wallace and Lucille Renard made major gifts to support the missions of the Department of Neuropsychiatry. In addition to general support of the department, these gifts were used to establish the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professorship in Psychiatry and to help build Renard Hospital.

For a list of Renard Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

1942: Dr. Edwin Gildea becomes the Head of the Department. He later becomes the first Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professor in Psychiatry.

Dr. Gildea received his MD from Harvard and remained in Boston for his internship, psychiatry training, and post-graduate training in neurology and neuropathology. After 12 years on the faculty at Yale, Dr. Gildea was recruited to head the Department of Neuropsychiatry at Washington University in 1942. He was interested in the biological basis of behavior and participated in biochemical research. During his 21 years as Head of the Department, Dr. Gildea attracted an extremely talented group of faculty members, including Drs. George Saslow, George Ulett, Eli Robins, Samuel Guze, George Winokur, Lee Robins, and George Murphy. He established an environment that encouraged intellectual growth, which set the stage for his talented faculty to develop a medical model approach to the field of psychiatry. Dr. Gildea was the first recipient of the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professorship in Psychiatry.

1943: A 54-bed neuropsychiatry inpatient unit is opened in McMillan Hospital.

Over the years, patients with psychiatric disorders have been treated at various locations on the medical campus. Prior to 1943, patients with neurologic or psychiatric disorders were cared for on the general medicine units. In 1943, an inpatient service of 54 beds for patients with neurological or psychiatric disorders was opened in McMillan Hospital. In 1955, Renard Hospital, a 100-bed hospital dedicated to the care of psychiatrically ill patients, was opened. In 1981, psychiatric units in the East and West Pavilions of Barnes Hospital were opened with a bed capacity similar to Renard Hospital (i.e., about 100 patients beds). Renard Hospital was renovated to house the Department’s main administrative offices as well as research laboratories.

1946: A psychosomatic medicine clinic called Medicine D Clinic is supervised by Dr. George Saslow.

Dr. George Saslow was a member of the Department of Neuropsychiatry from 1943 to 1955. He earned his MD from Harvard and obtained a PhD in physiology from NYU.He became interested in research pertaining to the psychiatric interview. Like many other members of the Department, he was influenced by Dr. Mandel Cohen from Harvard. After being recruited by Dr. Gildea, Saslow helped develop an outpatient psychosomatic clinic called Medicine D clinic, which opened in 1946. In 1950, Dr. Samuel Guze became the first psychosomatic fellow. Dr. Saslow was known for his talents as a clinical interviewer. He returned to Boston (MGH) in 1955 to work with Dr. Lindemann. Soon after this move, however, he moved to Oregon to become the Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at OHSU. He led that department from 1957 until 1973.

1949: Dr. Mandel Cohen arranges for Dr. Eli Robins to meet Dr. Edwin Gildea. Robins becomes a fellow at the Medical School later that year and works with Dr. Oliver Lowry.

Dr. Mandel Cohen was a Harvard psychiatrist who profoundly influenced the field of psychiatry.  Although surrounded in Boston by psychoanalytically oriented psychiatrists, Dr. Cohen was a contrarian and advocated for research and the scientific method. He published clinical articles that were data driven. Cohen was a strong supporter of Dr. Gildea and had substantial influence on the careers of many of the Washington University faculty, including Drs. George Saslow, Eli Robins, and Robert Woodruff.  Dr. Cohen was proud of the Washington University group and they, in turn, acknowledged his profound influence on their thinking. Dr. Eli Robins worked with Dr. Cohen on clinical research projects at Harvard. Dr. Cohen arranged for Dr. Robins to meet Dr. Gildea in 1949.  As a result of this meeting, Dr. Gildea arranged for Dr. Robins to work in the laboratory of Dr. Oliver Lowry at Washington University. 

Dr. Eli Robins received his MD from Harvard in 1943 and remained in Boston for training in psychiatry and neurology. As was true of many psychiatry trainees in Boston at the time, Dr. Robins underwent psychoanalysis for about one year. He did research with Dr. Mandel Cohen, who encouraged Robins to meet Dr. Edwin Gildea, the head of the Department of Neuropsychiatry at Washington University. Dr. Gildea suggested that Dr. Robins learn basic research approaches and arranged for him to work in Dr. Oliver Lowry’s laboratory at Washington University. After a two-year fellowship, Robins joined the Department of Neuropsychiatry in 1951 as an instructor. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1953, associate professor in 1956, and full professor in 1958. When Dr. Gildea stepped down as Head of the Department in 1963, Dr. Robins became Department Head. 

Dr. Lowry was a remarkable researcher and methodologist.  He developed an approach to microchemistry that enabled researchers to measure a variety of chemicals in single cells. Dr. Lowry was the Head of the Department of Pharmacology for 29 years and the Dean of the Medical School from 1955 to 1958.

1950: Dr. Samuel Guze becomes the first psychosomatic medicine fellow in the Medicine Clinic D run by Dr. George Saslow.

Dr. Samuel Guze obtained his MD from Washington University in 1945. He continued his training in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and Washington University, except for a year of medicine training in Connecticut. In 1950, he became a psychosomatic medicine fellow working with Dr. George Saslow. In 1955, Dr. Guze became an assistant professor of psychiatry, with promotion to associate professor in 1959 and full professor in 1964. Along with Eli Robins, Dr. Guze was one of the most influential figures in American psychiatry during the latter part of the 20th century, leading the revolution in criteria-based diagnoses that became DSM-III. 

Dr. George Saslow was a member of the Department of Neuropsychiatry from 1943 to 1955. He earned his MD from Harvard and obtained a PhD in physiology from NYU.He became interested in research pertaining to the psychiatric interview. Like many other members of the Department, he was influenced by Dr. Mandel Cohen from Harvard. After being recruited by Dr. Gildea, Saslow helped develop an outpatient psychosomatic clinic called Medicine D clinic, which opened in 1946. In 1950, Dr. Samuel Guze became the first psychosomatic fellow. Dr. Saslow was known for his talents as a clinical interviewer. He returned to Boston (MGH) in 1955 to work with Dr. Lindemann. Soon after this move, however, he moved to Oregon to become the Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at OHSU. He led that department from 1957 until 1973.

1951: Dr. Eli Robins joins the Department as an instructor.

Dr. Eli Robins received his MD from Harvard in 1943 and remained in Boston for training in psychiatry and neurology. As was true of many psychiatry trainees in Boston at the time, Dr. Robins underwent psychoanalysis for about one year. He did research with Dr. Mandel Cohen, who encouraged Robins to meet Dr. Edwin Gildea, the head of the Department of Neuropsychiatry at Washington University. Dr. Gildea suggested that Dr. Robins learn basic research approaches and arranged for him to work in Dr. Oliver Lowry’s laboratory at Washington University. After a two-year fellowship, Robins joined the Department of Neuropsychiatry in 1951 as an instructor. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1953, associate professor in 1956, and full professor in 1958. When Dr. Gildea stepped down as Head of the Department in 1963, Dr. Robins became Department Head. Despite having early symptoms of what was eventually thought to be multiple sclerosis, Dr. Robins successfully led a feisty group of psychiatrists that helped change the direction of American psychiatry. The Washington University psychiatry faculty were strong proponents of a scientifically based “medical model” approach to the field of psychiatry. This medical model approach was developed at a time when psychoanalysis dominated the field. Dr. Robins succeeded Dr. Gildea as the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professor in Psychiatry. When Dr. Robins stepped aside from being the Head of the Department in 1975, Dr. Samuel Guze was appointed Head. Dr. Robins passed away in December 1994. The Eli Robins Award was established in 1996 to recognize residents and/or fellows who best exemplify potential for excellence in research, clinical care and teaching.

1952: Dr. George Ulett establishes a departmental group at Malcolm Bliss.

Dr. Ulett joined the Department of Psychiatry in 1950. He became a full professor in 1956. He was interested in research that involved brain stimulation, including electroconvulsive therapy.  He established a team of clinical researchers at the city facility, Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute, in the early/mid 1950s. He became the medical director of Malcolm Bliss in 1956. In the early 1960s, Dr. Ulett became acting director of the Missouri Division of Mental Disease. He eventually left the University and became the permanent director of the Missouri Division of Mental Disease.  He was instrumental in Malcolm Bliss becoming a state facility.  In the mid 1960s, he helped establish the Missouri Institute of Psychiatry (MIP) at St. Louis State Hospital. Under his supervision, this institute became a major clinical, educational, and research center affiliated with the University of Missouri, Columbia. Dr. Ulett left MIP in the early 1970s and entered private practice.

1953: Jewish Hospital develops a hospital department of neuropsychiatry.

Jewish Hospital’s neuropsychiatry group was independent of the Department of Psychiatry at the Medical School until 1976. In the late 1950s, an inpatient adult psychiatry unit and an inpatient child psychiatry unit were opened at JH. The child psychiatry unit closed in 1964. These units were initially run by clinicians with a psychodynamic orientation. Dr. Irwin Levy, a neurologist and psychiatrist, headed the JH neuropsychiatry group from 1953 to 1958. The psychiatry division was subsequently headed by Dr. Alex Kaplan from 1958 to 1966 and Dr. Nathan Simon from 1967 to 1975. JH had its own residency training program until the mid 1970s. Several members of the JH faculty had appointments at St. Louis University. Dr. Harold Wolff served as head of the JH psychiatry department during a transitional year between 1975 and 1976. In 1976, JH contracted with the Washington University Department of Psychiatry, and Dr. Guze appointed Dr. Theodore Reich as Chief of Service. Residents from the department’s residency program and Washington University medical students rotated on the inpatient and outpatient services at JH. Dr. Reich became the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Psychiatry in 1989. He remained Chief of Service at JH until 1994 at which time the inpatient unit at JH was consolidated with the inpatient unit at Barnes Hospital. In 1996, Barnes Hospital and Jewish Hospital consolidated into Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

1955: Dr. George Winokur becomes an assistant professor of psychiatry in the Department and takes charge of the Residency Training Program.

Dr. George Winokur became an assistant professor of psychiatry in 1955. He was promoted to associate professor in 1959 and full professor in 1966. Some of his responsibilities included running the residency training program and heading the inpatient service. Together with Drs. Eli Robins and Samuel Guze, Dr. Winokur developed a medical model approach to the teaching and practice of psychiatry. Dr. Winokur left the Department in 1971 to chair the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa.

1955: Renard Hospital opens. It is named in honor of Wallace and Lucille Renard.

Over the years, patients with psychiatric disorders have been treated at various locations on the medical campus. Prior to 1943, patients with neurologic or psychiatric disorders were cared for on the general medicine units. In 1943, an inpatient service of 54 beds for patients with neurological or psychiatric disorders was opened in McMillan Hospital. In 1955, Renard Hospital, a 100-bed hospital dedicated to the care of psychiatrically ill patients, was opened. In 1981, psychiatric units in the East and West Pavilions of Barnes Hospital were opened with a bed capacity similar to Renard Hospital (i.e., about 100 patients beds). Renard Hospital was renovated to house the Department’s main administrative offices as well as research laboratories.

Between 1941 and 1949, Wallace and Lucille Renard made major gifts to support the missions of the Department of Neuropsychiatry. In addition to general support of the department, these gifts were used to establish the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professorship in Psychiatry and to help build Renard Hospital. For a list of Renard Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

1956: The Blanche F. Ittleson Professorship in Child Psychiatry is established.

The Ittleson family established the Ittleson Family Foundation in 1932. Blanche F. Ittleson served as a trustee of the Foundation for many years. Because of her interest in the mental health of children, Mrs. Ittleson was instrumental in funding this professorship. For a list of Ittleson Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

1958: The William Greenleaf Eliot Division of Child Psychiatry is established. Dr. E. James Anthony is recruited to head the Division and become the first Ittleson Professor.

The William Greenleaf Eliot Division of Child Psychiatry was established in 1958. The Division was named after William Greenleaf Eliot, a Unitarian minister in St. Louis during the 19th century.  In addition to being instrumental in the founding of Washington University and Mary Institute, Mr. Eliot also helped create what became the Mission Free School. Donations from the Mission Free School were used to help establish the Division of Child Psychiatry at Washington University.

Dr. E. James Anthony received his medical degree from King’s College in London. He was a senior lecturer in child psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry in London when he was recruited in 1958 to become the Director of the Child Psychiatry Division and the first Ittleson Professor of Child Psychiatry. He remained Director of the Child Psychiatry Division until 1981 and Ittleson Professor until 1983. He became professor emeritus in 1986. For a list of Directors of the Division of Child Psychiatry, click here.

1959: During the late 1950’s, Drs. Robins, Guze, and Winokur develop a medical model approach to psychiatry.

In the mid and late 1950s, Drs. Eli Robins, Samuel Guze, and George Winokur met often to discuss an approach to psychiatry that later became known as the medical model. This model was based on the belief that the scientific method was the appropriate vehicle for advancing the field. The importance of reliable diagnostic criteria for psychiatric disorders was emphasized. Research training was integrated into the residency training program. A series of studies was conducted that resulted in the development of psychiatric diagnostic criteria, which were summarized in the historic 1972 article “Diagnostic Criteria for Use in Psychiatric Diagnosis” by J. Feighner, E. Robins, S. Guze, R. Woodruff, G. Winokur, and R. Munoz (Arch Gen Psychiatry 26:57-63). In 1974, the first edition of Psychiatric Diagnosis by Woodruff, Goodwin, and Guze (Oxford University Press) was published. Dr. Guze summarized the concept of the medical model in Why Psychiatry is a Branch of Medicine (Oxford University Press), published in 1992.

1963: Dr. Eli Robins becomes Head of the Department.

Dr. Eli Robins received his MD from Harvard in 1943 and remained in Boston for training in psychiatry and neurology. As was true of many psychiatry trainees in Boston at the time, Dr. Robins underwent psychoanalysis for about one year. He did research with Dr. Mandel Cohen, who encouraged Robins to meet Dr. Edwin Gildea, the head of the Department of Neuropsychiatry at Washington University. Dr. Gildea suggested that Dr. Robins learn basic research approaches and arranged for him to work in Dr. Oliver Lowry’s laboratory at Washington University. After a two-year fellowship, Robins joined the Department of Neuropsychiatry in 1951 as an instructor. He was promoted to assistant professor in 1953, associate professor in 1956, and full professor in 1958. When Dr. Gildea stepped down as Head of the Department in 1963, Dr. Robins became Department Head. Despite having early symptoms of what was eventually thought to be multiple sclerosis, Dr. Robins successfully led a feisty group of psychiatrists that helped change the direction of American psychiatry. The Washington University psychiatry faculty were strong proponents of a scientifically based “medical model” approach to the field of psychiatry. This medical model approach was developed at a time when psychoanalysis dominated the field. Dr. Robins succeeded Dr. Gildea as the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professor in Psychiatry. When Dr. Robins stepped aside from being the Head of the Department in 1975, Dr. Samuel Guze was appointed Head. Dr. Robins passed away in December 1994. The Eli Robins Award was established in 1996 to recognize residents and/or fellows who best exemplify potential for excellence in research, clinical care and teaching.

1964: Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute becomes a state facility, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center.

Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute opened in 1938 as a hospital in the St. Louis City hospital system. Washington University psychiatry professor Dr. George Ulett initiated clinical research at Bliss in the 1950s. Dr. Ulett later became director of Missouri’s Division of Mental Disease. In 1964, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center became part of Missouri’s mental health system. In 1991, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center closed. A section of St. Louis State Hospital was temporarily set up to serve patients formerly treated at Malcolm Bliss. In 1996, patients were transferred to a newly built state facility, Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center. Washington University psychiatry residents and medical students rotated at these hospitals throughout much of their history until most inpatient services were discontinued in 2011.

1966: Dr. Eli Robins is installed as the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professor in Psychiatry.

When Dr. Gildea stepped down as Head of the Department in 1963, Dr. Robins became Department Head. Despite having early symptoms of what was eventually thought to be multiple sclerosis, Dr. Robins successfully led a feisty group of psychiatrists that helped change the direction of American psychiatry. The Washington University psychiatry faculty were strong proponents of a scientifically based “medical model” approach to the field of psychiatry. This medical model approach was developed at a time when psychoanalysis dominated the field. Dr. Robins succeeded Dr. Gildea as the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professor in Psychiatry. When Dr. Robins stepped aside from being the Head of the Department in 1975, Dr. Samuel Guze was appointed Head. Dr. Robins passed away in December 1994. The Eli Robins Award was established in 1996 to recognize residents and/or fellows who best exemplify potential for excellence in research, clinical care and teaching.

Between 1941 and 1949, Wallace and Lucille Renard made major gifts to support the missions of the Department of Neuropsychiatry. In addition to general support of the department, these gifts were used to establish the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professorship in Psychiatry and to help build Renard Hospital. For a list of Renard Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

1967: A federally funded Washington University Alcoholism Research Center is established in the Department.

Funded Centers or Unique Programs

1967    A federally funded Alcoholism Research Center is established in the Department. Dr. Samuel Guze is the principal investigator. This center provided the foundation for the Department’s continued long-term success in alcoholism research.

1972    A federally funded Drug Abuse Research Center is established. Dr. Theodore Cicero is the principal investigator.

1978    A center titled “Models of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Family Resemblance in Psychiatry” is funded. Dr. C. Robert Cloninger is the principal investigator. In 1986, this grant was renamed the “Epidemiological Genetics and Family Study.”

1989    The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is established. Dr. Theodore Reich was a founding member.

1989    The Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program is established and headed by Dr. Lee Robins.

1999    The Midwest Alcoholism Research Center (MARC) is funded. The Department took a lead role in organizing this collaborative project. Dr. Andrew Heath is the first head of the Center. The Center is responsible for the initiation of the annual Samuel B. Guze Symposium in 2001.

2001    The Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders is established in the Department.  Dr. John Csernansky is the first head of this center. The Conte Center is dedicated to the study of schizophrenia and related disorders.

2002    The Sansone Family Center for Well-Being is established. Dr. Cloninger is the first head of this center.

2013    The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research is established with major gifts from Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation. Dr. Charles F. Zorumski is the first director of this institute.

1968: Dr. Lee Robins becomes professor of sociology in psychiatry.

Dr. Lee Robins earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1951 and joined the Department as a part time research assistant in 1954. She became research assistant professor in 1958. In 1968, she became professor of sociology in psychiatry. In 1991, she was named a University Professor of Social Science, a position that acknowledges distinguished scholars whose work overlaps various disciplines and schools. Dr. Robins had a pivotal role in the development of the field of psychiatric epidemiology. From her classic longitudinal studies of deviant children (Deviant Children Grown Up, Williams & Wilkins, 1966) to the development and implementation of standardized diagnostic instruments, Lee Robins has had a major influence on the entire field of psychiatry and on a generation of psychiatric leaders. Dr. Robins passed away in September 2009.

1971: Dr. Samuel Guze is appointed Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs.

Dr. Samuel Guze obtained his MD from Washington University in 1945. He continued his training in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and Washington University, except for a year of medicine training in Connecticut. In 1950, he became a psychosomatic medicine fellow working with Dr. George Saslow. In 1955, Dr. Guze became an assistant professor of psychiatry, with promotion to associate professor in 1959 and full professor in 1964. Along with Eli Robins, Dr. Guze was one of the most influential figures in American psychiatry during the latter part of the 20th century, leading the revolution in criteria-based diagnoses that became DSM-III. He and Dr. Robins also developed criteria for validating psychiatric diagnoses that are still used today. In addition to clinical and research skills, Dr. Guze served Washington University in several major administrative roles. He became the Assistant to the Dean from 1965 to 1971. In 1971, he was appointed the Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs of the Medical School where he oversaw the redevelopment of the Medical Center and the Central West End. In 1975, he also became Head of the Department of Psychiatry. He maintained both positions until 1989 and served as Department Head again from 1993 until 1997. Dr. Guze was the first recipient of the Spencer T. Olin Professorship in Psychiatry. In 1999, he and his family established the Samuel B. Guze Professorship. Dr. Guze passed away in July 2000.

1971: Dr. George Winokur leaves the Department to become chair of psychiatry at the University of Iowa.

Dr. George Winokur became an assistant professor of psychiatry in 1955. He was promoted to associate professor in 1959 and full professor in 1966. Some of his responsibilities included running the residency training program and heading the inpatient service. Together with Drs. Eli Robins and Samuel Guze, Dr. Winokur developed a medical model approach to the teaching and practice of psychiatry. Dr. Winokur left the Department in 1971 to chair the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Iowa.

1971: Dr. Richard Hudgens becomes Residency Training Director.

Dr. Richard Hudgens joined the Department in 1963.  From 1967 to 1974, he was also the assistant and then associate dean for curriculum at the Medical School.  From 1971 to 1974, he served as Residency Training Director. Dr. Hudgens left the full time faculty in 1974 to enter private practice. During his time in private practice, he remained active in teaching residents and medical students at Washington University. In 1989, Dr. Cloninger recruited Dr. Hudgens back to the full time faculty. Dr. Hudgens has won numerous teaching awards. He also is very interested in preserving the history of the Department and provided materials that aided in the development of this time line history.

1972: A federally funded Drug Abuse Research Center is established in the Department.

Funded Centers or Unique Programs

1967    A federally funded Alcoholism Research Center is established in the Department. Dr. Samuel Guze is the principal investigator. This center provided the foundation for the Department’s continued long-term success in alcoholism research.

1972    A federally funded Drug Abuse Research Center is established. Dr. Theodore Cicero is the principal investigator.

1978    A center titled “Models of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Family Resemblance in Psychiatry” is funded. Dr. C. Robert Cloninger is the principal investigator. In 1986, this grant was renamed the “Epidemiological Genetics and Family Study.”

1989    The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is established. Dr. Theodore Reich was a founding member.

1989    The Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program is established and headed by Dr. Lee Robins.

1999    The Midwest Alcoholism Research Center (MARC) is funded. The Department took a lead role in organizing this collaborative project. Dr. Andrew Heath is the first head of the Center. The Center is responsible for the initiation of the annual Samuel B. Guze Symposium in 2001.

2001    The Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders is established in the Department.  Dr. John Csernansky is the first head of this center. The Conte Center is dedicated to the study of schizophrenia and related disorders.

2002    The Sansone Family Center for Well-Being is established. Dr. Cloninger is the first head of this center.

2013    The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research is established with major gifts from Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation. Dr. Charles F. Zorumski is the first director of this institute.

1974: The Spencer T. Olin Professorship in Psychiatry is established. Dr. Samuel Guze is installed as the first Olin Professor.

Spencer T. Olin and his wife Ann established this professorship in 1974. Mr. Olin served the St. Louis community in a variety of important roles, including Washington University trustee and Barnes-Jewish Hospital board member. In addition to their time and energy, the family has been extraordinarily generous with many important donations to the University over the years. For a list of Olin Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

Dr. Samuel Guze obtained his MD from Washington University in 1945. He continued his training in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and Washington University, except for a year of medicine training in Connecticut. In 1950, he became a psychosomatic medicine fellow working with Dr. George Saslow. In 1955, Dr. Guze became an assistant professor of psychiatry, with promotion to associate professor in 1959 and full professor in 1964. Along with Eli Robins, Dr. Guze was one of the most influential figures in American psychiatry during the latter part of the 20th century, leading the revolution in criteria-based diagnoses that became DSM-III. He and Dr. Robins also developed criteria for validating psychiatric diagnoses that are still used today. In addition to clinical and research skills, Dr. Guze served Washington University in several major administrative roles. He became the Assistant to the Dean from 1965 to 1971. In 1971, he was appointed the Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs of the Medical School where he oversaw the redevelopment of the Medical Center and the Central West End. In 1975, he also became Head of the Department of Psychiatry. He maintained both positions until 1989 and served as Department Head again from 1993 until 1997. Dr. Guze was the first recipient of the Spencer T. Olin Professorship in Psychiatry. In 1999, he and his family established the Samuel B. Guze Professorship. Dr. Guze passed away in July 2000.

1974: Dr. Robert Woodruff becomes Residency Training Director.

Dr. Robert Woodruff joined the faculty as an instructor in 1966. He rose to the rank of professor in 1974. He was instrumental in the writing of the classic text Psychiatric Diagnosis by Woodruff, Goodwin, and Guze (Oxford University Press, 1974). He was an active researcher and also served at various times as head of the inpatient psychiatry service, outpatient psychiatry clinic director, and director of the consult service. He took over as Residency Training Director at the end of 1974 and held the position until his death in 1976.

1975: Dr. Samuel Guze becomes Head of the Department

Dr. Samuel Guze obtained his MD from Washington University in 1945. He continued his training in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and Washington University, except for a year of medicine training in Connecticut. In 1950, he became a psychosomatic medicine fellow working with Dr. George Saslow. In 1955, Dr. Guze became an assistant professor of psychiatry, with promotion to associate professor in 1959 and full professor in 1964. Along with Eli Robins, Dr. Guze was one of the most influential figures in American psychiatry during the latter part of the 20th century, leading the revolution in criteria-based diagnoses that became DSM-III. He and Dr. Robins also developed criteria for validating psychiatric diagnoses that are still used today. In addition to clinical and research skills, Dr. Guze served Washington University in several major administrative roles. He became the Assistant to the Dean from 1965 to 1971. In 1971, he was appointed the Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs of the Medical School where he oversaw the redevelopment of the Medical Center and the Central West End. In 1975, he also became Head of the Department of Psychiatry. He maintained both positions until 1989 and served as Department Head again from 1993 until 1997. Dr. Guze was the first recipient of the Spencer T. Olin Professorship in Psychiatry. In 1999, he and his family established the Samuel B. Guze Professorship. Dr. Guze passed away in July 2000.

 

1976: Dr. Theodore Reich is appointed Head of the Jewish Hospital Department of Psychiatry.

Dr. Ted Reich joined the Department as an assistant professor in 1971.  He rose to the level of professor in 1977. He was Head of the Jewish Hospital Department of Psychiatry from 1976 until 1994, when the inpatient service at Jewish combined with the inpatient service at Barnes Hospital.  Dr. Reich subsequently became director of the outpatient psychiatry clinic. In 1989, he was installed as the first Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry. From 1992 until 1998, he served the Department as the Vice Chair for Clinical Research. Dr. Reich was a world leader in the field of psychiatric genetics. He passed away in December 2003.

1976: Dr. Amos Welner becomes Residency Training Director.

Dr. Welner joined the Department as an assistant professor in 1972 after completing his psychiatry residency in the Department. He became associate professor in 1975. He became director of the residency training program in 1976 and continued as program director until 1979. He passed away in 1981.

1976: Dr. Donald W. Goodwin leaves the Department to accept the chair of psychiatry at the University of Kansas.

Dr. Goodwin became an instructor in 1968 after completing his residency in the Department. He became assistant professor in 1969, associate professor in 1972, and professor in 1974. He published widely and was a leading authority on the topic of alcoholism.  Among his many publications, he was a coauthor (with Drs. Woodruff and Guze) of the classic book Psychiatric Diagnosis  (Oxford Press, 1974).  He became chair of psychiatry at the University of Kansas in 1976.

1976: The Eli Robins Lectureship is established.

1976-1977 R. E. Kendell, M.D.
1977-1978 Ross Baldessarini, M.D.
1978-1979 David Goldberg, M.D.
1979-1980 Arnold J. Friedhoff, M.D.
1980-1981 Hagop S. Akiskal, M.D.
1981-1982 Walle J. H. Nauta, M.D., Ph.D.
1982-1983 Herman M. van Praag, M.D., Ph.D.
1983-1984 Herbert Y. Meltzer, M.D.
1984-1985 Leon Eisenberg, M.D.
1985-1986 Larry R. Squire, Ph.D.
1986-1987 None
1987-1988 Professor Paul E. Bebbington
1988-1989 Robert Freedman, M.D.
1989-1990 Mandel E. Cohen, M.D.
1990-1991 Matthew Rudorfer, M.D.
1991-1992 Jane M. Murphy, Ph.D
1992-1993 Robert G. Robinson, M.D.
1993-1994 Paula J. Clayton, M.D.
1994-1995 Harold A. Sackeim, Ph.D.
1995-1996 Patricia S. Goldman-Rakic, Ph.D.
1996-1997 None
1997-1998 Henry Roediger, Ph.D.
1998-1999 William Eaton, M.D.
1999-2000 Steven E. Petersen, Ph.D.
2000-2001 Rolf Loeber, Ph.D.
2001-2002 Naomi Breslau, Ph.D.
2002-2003 Lee Robins, Ph.D.
2003-2004 John E. Helzer, M.D.
2004-2005 Ming Tsuang, M.D., Ph.D.
2005-2006 Bruce McEwen, Ph.D.
2006-2007 James Hudziak, M.D.
2007-2008 Wilson Compton, M.D.
2008-2009 Marc Raichle, M.D. and Karen F. Berman, M.D.
2009-2010 Maurizio Corbetta, M.D.
2010-2011 Bradley L. Schlaggar, M.D., Ph.D.
2011-2012 Wayne Drevets, M.D.
2012-2013 Fritz Henn, Ph.D., M.D.
2013-2014 None
2014-2015 Wayne Goodman,M.D.
2015-2016 Steven E. Hyman, M.D.
2016-2017 Sheldon Preskorn, M.D.
2017-2018 Huda Akil, Ph.D.
2018-2019 Charles Raison, M.D.

1976: The Department receives funding for its first training grant, "Research Training in Clinical Sciences."

The Department’s training grants were initially established on the following dates:

1976 – Research Training in Clinical Sciences

1983 – Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics

1991 – Biomedical Training in Drug Abuse

1999 – Drug Abuse Comorbidity and Biostatistics

2005 – Biomedical Training in Alcohol Research

2006 – Indo-US Fogarty Training Program in Behavioral Disorders

2010 – Nutrition-Behavioral Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

1977: The Edwin Gildea Lectureship is established.

Edwin F. Gildea Lecturers

1978-1979 Professor Michael Shepherd
1979-1980 Floyd E. Bloom, M.D.
1980-1981 Professor Timothy J. Crow
1981-1982 Professor Erik Strömgren
1982-1983 Alwyn Lishman, M.D.
1983-1984 Professor Nils Retterstøl
1984-1985 None
1985-1986 Professor Gerald Russell and Fini Schulsinger, M.D.
1986-1987 Professor Einar Kringlen
1987-1988 Professor Patricia Smith Churchland
1988-1989 Seymour Reichlin, M.D., Ph.D. and Daniel C. Dennett, D.Phil.
1989-1990 John F. Greden, M.D.
1990-1991 None
1991-1992 Donald F. Klein, M.D. and Rachel Gittleman Klein, Ph.D.
1992-1993 Dr. Jeffrey A. Gray and Richard J. Wyatt, M.D.
1993-1994 Professor Eve C. Johnstone
1994-1995 Joseph T. Coyle, M.D. and Charles P. O’Brien, M.D., Ph.D.
1995-1996 Elizabeth F. Loftus, Ph.D. and Kay Jamison, Ph.D.
1996-1997 Francine N. Benes, M.D., Ph.D. and Raquel E. Gur, M.D., Ph.D.
1997-1998 Eric J. Nestler, M.D., Ph.D.
1998-1999 Dr. Peter McGuffin
1999-2000 Joseph S. Takahashi, Ph.D.
2000-2001 Pierre J. Magistretti, M.D., Ph.D.
2001-2002 Jerry Siegel, M.D.
2002-2003 Joseph Biederman, M.D.
2003-2004 Terrence J. Sejnowski, Ph.D.
2004-2005 None
2005-2006 Mark Gold, M.D.
2006-2007 Kenneth B. Wells, M.D., M.P.H.Helen Mayberg, M.D.
2007-2008 P. Read Montague, Ph.D.
2008-2009 Jaak Panksepp, Ph.D.
2009-2010 Irving I. Gottesman, Ph.D.
2010-2011 Carol A. Tamminga, M.D.
2011-2012 Jose Pardo, M.D., Ph.D. and Ronald S. Duman, Ph.D.
2012-2013 BJ Casey, Ph.D.
2013-2014 Steven M. Paul, M.D.
2014-2015 Andreas Meyer-Lindenberg, M.D., Ph.D. and Joseph Piven, M.D.
2015-2016 Steven Miller, M.D. and Kathy Wisner, M.D.
2016-2017 Myrna M. Weissman, Ph.D.
2017-2018 Susan Essock, Ph.D.
2018-2019 None

 

1978: A federally funded center entitled "Models of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Family Resemblance in Psychiatry" is established in the Department.

Funded Centers or Unique Programs

1967    A federally funded Alcoholism Research Center is established in the Department. Dr. Samuel Guze is the principal investigator. This center provided the foundation for the Department’s continued long-term success in alcoholism research.

1972    A federally funded Drug Abuse Research Center is established. Dr. Theodore Cicero is the principal investigator.

1978    A center titled “Models of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Family Resemblance in Psychiatry” is funded. Dr. C. Robert Cloninger is the principal investigator. In 1986, this grant was renamed the “Epidemiological Genetics and Family Study.”

1989    The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is established. Dr. Theodore Reich was a founding member.

1989    The Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program is established and headed by Dr. Lee Robins.

1999    The Midwest Alcoholism Research Center (MARC) is funded. The Department took a lead role in organizing this collaborative project. Dr. Andrew Heath is the first head of the Center. The Center is responsible for the initiation of the annual Samuel B. Guze Symposium in 2001.

2001    The Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders is established in the Department.  Dr. John Csernansky is the first head of this center. The Conte Center is dedicated to the study of schizophrenia and related disorders.

2002    The Sansone Family Center for Well-Being is established. Dr. Cloninger is the first head of this center.

2013    The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research is established with major gifts from Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation. Dr. Charles F. Zorumski is the first director of this institute.

1978: The Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) is developed.

Because NIMH was interested in the development of a psychiatric diagnostic interview that would be useful for epidemiologic studies, Dr. Lee Robins and her colleagues developed the DIS. Versions of this diagnostic interview have played and continue to play a major role in the advancement of the field of psychiatric epidemiology.

Dr. Robins had a pivotal role in the development of the field of psychiatric epidemiology. From her classic longitudinal studies of deviant children (Deviant Children Grown Up, Williams & Wilkins, 1966) to the development and implementation of standardized diagnostic instruments, Lee Robins has had a major influence on the entire field of psychiatry and on a generation of psychiatric leaders. Dr. Robins passed away in September 2009.

1979: Dr. John Helzer becomes Residency Training Director

Dr. John Helzer became an instructor in the Department in 1974. By 1983, he had become a professor. He was the Residency Training Director from 1979 to 1985. At various times, he also was the director of the consult service and inpatient psychiatry director. In 1989, Dr. Helzer left the Department and became chair of psychiatry at the University of Vermont.

1979: The Epidemiological Catchment Area Program (ECA study) is funded.

Dr. Lee Robins is the principal investigator of this seminal psychiatric epidemiological project.

1981: A modern psychiatric facility opens in Barnes Hospital, and patients are transferred from Renard Hospital.

Over the years, patients with psychiatric disorders have been treated at various locations on the medical campus. Prior to 1943, patients with neurologic or psychiatric disorders were cared for on the general medicine units. In 1943, an inpatient service of 54 beds for patients with neurological or psychiatric disorders was opened in McMillan Hospital. In 1955, Renard Hospital, a 100-bed hospital dedicated to the care of psychiatrically ill patients, was opened. In 1981, psychiatric units in the East and West Pavilions of Barnes Hospital were opened with a bed capacity similar to Renard Hospital (i.e., about 100 patients beds). Renard Hospital was renovated to house the Department’s main administrative offices as well as research laboratories.

1981: Dr. Felton Earls becomes Director of the William Greenleaf Eliot Division of Child Psychiatry.

Dr. Earls joined the faculty in 1981 and became the director of the Division of Child Psychiatry.  He was installed as the Blanche F. Ittleson Professor in 1983.  He left the University in 1989. For a list of Directors of the Division of Child Psychiatry, click here.

The Ittleson family established the Ittleson Family Foundation in 1932. Blanche F. Ittleson served as a trustee of the Foundation for many years. Because of her interest in the mental health of children, Mrs. Ittleson was instrumental in funding this professorship. For a list of Ittleson Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

1981: Dr. Paula Clayton leaves to become chair of the department of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota.

Dr. Paula Clayton joined the faculty in 1965 and remained with the Department until 1981 when she left to become the chair of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota. She published pivotal studies on bereavement.  With Drs. George Winokur, Eli Robins, and Theodore Reich, she published the classic book Manic-Depressive Illness in 1969. Dr. Clayton was director of the inpatient psychiatry unit from 1975 to 1981.

1983: The training grant "Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics" is funded.

The Department’s training grants were initially established on the following dates:

1976 – Research Training in Clinical Sciences

1983 – Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics

1991 – Biomedical Training in Drug Abuse

1999 – Drug Abuse Comorbidity and Biostatistics

2005 – Biomedical Training in Alcohol Research

2006 – Indo-US Fogarty Training Program in Behavioral Disorders

2010 – Nutrition-Behavioral Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

1983: Dr. Felton Earls is installed as the Blanche F. Ittleson Professor in Child Psychiatry

Dr. Earls joined the faculty in 1981 and became the director of the Division of Child Psychiatry.  He was installed as the Blanche F. Ittleson Professor in 1983.  He left the University in 1989. For a list of Directors of the Division of Child Psychiatry, click here.

The Ittleson family established the Ittleson Family Foundation in 1932. Blanche F. Ittleson served as a trustee of the Foundation for many years. Because of her interest in the mental health of children, Mrs. Ittleson was instrumental in funding this professorship. For a list of Ittleson Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

1985: Dr. John Knesevich becomes Residency Training Director

Dr. Knesevich was a resident and chief resident/instructor in the Department. Following his chief residency, he became an instructor in 1977 and later became assistant professor. In 1981, he became associate director of the residency training program. He became the director of the training program in 1985 and continued as director until 1987. He left the University in 1987.

1986: The Alex Kaplan Lectureship is established.

Dr. Alex Kaplan maintained a close affiliation with the Department as a member of the voluntary clinical faculty from 1946 until his death in 1996. Dr. Kaplan was the Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Jewish Hospital from about 1958 until 1966. He was the acting director of the Community Child Guidance Clinic from 1955 to 1958. He was a prominent member of the St. Louis psychoanalytic community. Dr. Kaplan was a regular attendee of departmental Grand Rounds and was always willing to share his knowledge. An endowed lectureship was established in his honor.

Alex H. Kaplan Lecturers

1986-1987 George E. Vaillant, M.D.
1987-1988 Kenneth Z. Altshuler, M.D
1988-1989 Phillip S. Holzman, Ph.D.
1989-1990 Robert J. Stoller, M.D.
1990-1991 Ramon Greenberg, M.D.
1991-1992 None
1992-1993 Carol C. Nadelson, M.D.
1993-1994 John C. Nemiah, M.D.
1994-1995 Robert N. Emde, M.D.
1995-1996 Glen O. Gabbard, M.D.
1996-1997 None
1997-1998 Susan Vaughan, M.D.
1998-1999 None
1999-2000 None
2000-2001 Ellen Frank, Ph.D.
2001-2002 None
2002-2003 Marsha Linehan, Ph.D.
2003-2004 None
2004-2005 Joan Lang, M.D.
2005-2006 George E. Vaillant, M.D.
2006-2007 Lisa Mellman, M.D.
2007-2008 Jerald Kay, M.D.
2008-2009 Eric Nuetzel, M.D. and Randy Larsen, Ph.D.
2009-2010 None
2010-2011 Barbara L. Milrod, M.D.
2011-2012 Steven Roose, M.D.
2012-2013 Eve Caligor, M.D.
2013-2014 Steven T. Levy, M.D.
2014-2015 Georg Northoff, M.D., Ph.D.
2015-2016 John Clarkin, Ph.D.
2016-2017 Jonathan Shedler, Ph.D.
2017-2018 Peter Buckley, M.D.
2018-2019 J. Reid Meloy, Ph.D.

 

1986: The Gregory B. Couch Professorship in Psychiatry is established.

The family of Gregory B. Couch established this Professorship to honor his memory. They were appreciative of the excellent care Mr. Couch received from Washington University physicians. They also wanted to help advance research pertaining to schizophrenia. In addition to endowing the professorship, family members have generously provided additional research support. For a list of Couch Professors and other endowed professorships in the Department, click here.

1987: The Frank Shobe Lectureship is established.

Dr. Frank Shobe attended Washington University for both his undergraduate and medical education. He was a resident in neuropsychiatry at Barnes and McMillan Hospitals before entering private practice. He was a member of the voluntary faculty from 1949 until 1986 and achieved the title of professor of clinical psychiatry. Following his death in 1986, a lectureship was established in his honor.

Frank O. Shobe Lecturers

1987-1988 Samuel H. Barondes, M.D.
1988-1989 T. Byram Karasu, M.D.
1989-1990 None
1990-1991 None
1991-1992 None
1992-1993 None
1993-1994 Kathryn Montgomery Hunter, Ph.D.
1994-1995 None
1995-1996 Marc Rodwin, J.D., Ph.D.
1996-1997 None
1997-1998 None
1998-1999 None
1999-2000 Edwin H. Cook, M.D.
2000-2001 Kathleen R. Merikangas, Ph.D.
2001-2002 David A. Lewis, M.D.
2002-2003 Dwight L. Evans, M.D.
2003-2004 Charles Nemeroff, M.D.
2004-2005 Barry Hoffer, M.D.
2005-2006 Wayne Goodman, M.D.
2006-2007 Joel Yager, M.D.
2007-2008 Eric Reiman, M.D.
2008-2009 Kerry Ressler, M.D. Ph.D.
2009-2010 Gregory S. Berns, M.D.
2010-2011 John J. Foxe, Ph.D.
2011-2012 Mark Bear, Ph.D.
2012-2013 Mark Olfson, M.D., M.P.H.
2013-2014 Judith L. Rapoport, M.D.
2014-2015 Roberta Brinton, Ph.D.
2015-2016 David R. Rubinow, M.D.
2016-2017 Carlos Zarate, M.D.
2017-2018 Lisa Marsch, Ph.D. & C. Neill Epperson, M.D.
2018-2019 Mary McKay, Ph.D.

 

1987: Dr. Eugene Rubin becomes Residency Training Director.

Dr. Eugene Rubin obtained his MD and PhD in the Medical Scientist Training Program at Washington University. He was a resident in the psychiatry training program and, in 1982, was appointed a chief resident and instructor. He became assistant professor in 1983 and professor in 1992. He was appointed Vice Chair for Education in 1992.

1987: Dr. Abby Wasserman becomes Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Program

Dr. Wasserman joined the Department as an assistant professor in 1987. She directed the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Program from 1987 until 1990, at which time she left the University.

1989: Dr. C. Robert Cloninger becomes Head of the Department

After completing his psychiatry residency at Washington University, Dr. Cloninger joined the Department as an assistant professor in 1973. He became a full professor in 1981. He was appointed the Head of the Department in 1989 and led the Department until 1993. In 1991, he was installed as the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professor of Psychiatry. In 1994, he became the Director of the Center for Psychobiology of Personality, and in 2002 he became the Director of the Sansone Family Center for Well-Being. He retired in 2019.

1989: The Master of Psychiatric Epidemiology Program is established through the efforts of Dr. Lee Robins, who becomes the first director of the program.

The Master of Psychiatric Epidemiology Program was created by Dr. Lee Robins in 1989 to provide research training in psychiatric epidemiology. Dr. Wilson Compton took over the leadership of the MPE program in 1997. Dr. Compton left the University in 2002 for a position at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Linda Cottler took over the leadership of the MPE program after Dr. Compton’s departure. When Dr. Cottler left to become Chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Florida in 2011, Dr. Rumi Price assumed leadership of the program. Over the next several years, Dr. Price successfully transitioned the MPE program to the Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Sciences Concentration in the Master of Population Health Sciences (MPHS) program.

1989: The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism is established.

Funded Centers or Unique Programs

1967    A federally funded Alcoholism Research Center is established in the Department. Dr. Samuel Guze is the principal investigator. This center provided the foundation for the Department’s continued long-term success in alcoholism research.

1972    A federally funded Drug Abuse Research Center is established. Dr. Theodore Cicero is the principal investigator.

1978    A center titled “Models of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Family Resemblance in Psychiatry” is funded. Dr. C. Robert Cloninger is the principal investigator. In 1986, this grant was renamed the “Epidemiological Genetics and Family Study.”

1989    The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is established. Dr. Theodore Reich was a founding member.

1989    The Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program is established and headed by Dr. Lee Robins.

1999    The Midwest Alcoholism Research Center (MARC) is funded. The Department took a lead role in organizing this collaborative project. Dr. Andrew Heath is the first head of the Center. The Center is responsible for the initiation of the annual Samuel B. Guze Symposium in 2001.

2001    The Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders is established in the Department.  Dr. John Csernansky is the first head of this center. The Conte Center is dedicated to the study of schizophrenia and related disorders.

2002    The Sansone Family Center for Well-Being is established. Dr. Cloninger is the first head of this center.

2013    The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research is established with major gifts from Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation. Dr. Charles F. Zorumski is the first director of this institute.

1989: The Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry is established at Jewish Hospital. Dr. Theodore Reich, as Head of the Jewish Hospital Department of Psychiatry, is installed as the first Ludwig Chair.

The Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry was established at Jewish Hospital in 1989. The Ludwigs were active in the Jewish Federation of St. Louis. They were wonderful supporters of Jewish Hospital, and their support continues into perpetuity with their generous gift of an endowed professorship. Following the closure of the Department of Psychiatry at Jewish Hospital, the Ludwig Chair eventually became the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. For a list of Ludwig Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

Dr. Ted Reich joined the Department as an assistant professor in 1971.  He rose to the level of professor in 1977. He was Head of the Jewish Hospital Department of Psychiatry from 1976 until 1994, when the inpatient service at Jewish combined with the inpatient service at Barnes Hospital.  Dr. Reich subsequently became director of the outpatient psychiatry clinic. In 1989, he was installed as the first Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry. From 1992 until 1998, he served the Department as the Vice Chair for Clinical Research. Dr. Reich was a world leader in the field of psychiatric genetics. He passed away in December 2003.

1989: Dr. John Helzer leaves to become chair of the department of psychiatry at the University of Vermont.

Dr. John Helzer became an instructor in the Department in 1974. By 1983, he had become a professor. He was the Residency Training Director from 1979 to 1985. At various times, he also was the director of the consult service and inpatient psychiatry director. In 1989, Dr. Helzer left the Department and became chair of psychiatry at the University of Vermont.

1989: Hawthorn Children’s Psychiatric Hospital becomes a training site for the child and adolescent psychiatry training program.

Hawthorn Children’s Psychiatric Center was developed in 1976 as part of the state mental health system on the campus of St. Louis State Hospital. It moved to its current location in St. Louis County in 1989. It continues to be an important part of the child and adolescent psychiatry training program.

1990: Dr. Richard Mattison is appointed the Director of the William Greenleaf Eliot Division of Child Psychiatry and is installed as the Blanche F. Ittleson Associate Professor in Child Psychiatry

Dr. Mattison joined the Department in 1990 as the Director of the William Greenleaf Eliot Division of Child Psychiatry and the Blanche F. Ittelson Associate Professor in Child Psychiatry.  He also was the Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Program from 1990 until 1994. Dr. Mattison left the University in 1995. For a list of Directors of the Division of Child Psychiatry, click here.

1990: The Samuel B. Guze Lectureship is established.

Samuel B. Guze Lecturers

1990-1991 Nils Retterstøl, M.D.
1991-1992 Professor Peter R. Joyce
1992-1993 Professor Michael G. Gelder
1993-1994 David R. Offord, M.D.
1994-1995 Jack D. Barchas, M.D.
1995-1996 Ronald C. Kessler, Ph.D.
1996-1997 Adolf Grünbaum, Ph.D.
1997-1998 Rodrigo A. Muñoz, M.D.
1998-1999 Nancy C. Andreasen, M.D., Ph.D.
1999-2000 Edward Shorter, Ph.D.
2000-2001 Roger E. Meyer, M.D.
2001-2002 Mark S. George, M.D.
2002-2003 J. Raymond DePaulo, Jr., M.D.
2003-2004 None
2004-2005 Ezra Susser, M.D.
2005-2006 Harold A. Sackeim, Ph.D.
2006-2007 Dan Blazer, M.D., Ph.D.
2007-2008 Kenneth S. Kendler, M.D.
2008-2009 Karl Deisseroth, M.D., Ph.D.
2009-2010 Carol North, M.D., M.P.E.
2010-2011 Sean H. Yutzy, M.D.
2011-2012 Sarah “Holly” Lisanby, M.D.
2012-2013 James Hudziak, M.D.
2013-2014 Eric Nestler, M.D., Ph.D.
2014-2015 Stephan Heckers, M.D., M.Sc.
2015-2016 Kenneth M. Ludmerer, M.D.
2016-2017 Dost Ongur, M.D., Ph.D.
2017-2018 Charles F. Reynolds III, M.D.
2018-2019 Joshua A. Gordon, M.D.

 

1990: Dr. John Csernansky is installed as the Gregory B. Couch Associate Professor in Psychiatry.

Dr. John Csernansky joined the Department as an associate professor in 1990, and he was named the Gregory B. Couch Associate Professor at that time. He received his MD from NYU and did his residency training in psychiatry at Stanford. He became the Gregory B. Couch Professor of Psychiatry in 1995. He has made substantial contributions in the study of schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. In 2008, Dr. Csernansky left the department to become chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

The family of Gregory B. Couch established this Professorship to honor his memory. They were appreciative of the excellent care Mr. Couch received from Washington University physicians. They also wanted to help advance research pertaining to schizophrenia. In addition to endowing the professorship, family members have generously provided additional research support. For a list of Couch Professors and other endowed professorships in the Department, click here.

1991: The training grant "Biomedical Training in Drug Abuse" is initiated.

The Department’s training grants were initially established on the following dates:

1976 – Research Training in Clinical Sciences

1983 – Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics

1991 – Biomedical Training in Drug Abuse

1999 – Drug Abuse Comorbidity and Biostatistics

2005 – Biomedical Training in Alcohol Research

2006 – Indo-US Fogarty Training Program in Behavioral Disorders

2010 – Nutrition-Behavioral Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

1991: Dr. Lee Robins is named the University Professor of Social Science.

Dr. Lee Robins earned her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1951 and joined the Department as a part time research assistant in 1954. She became research assistant professor in 1958. In 1968, she became professor of sociology in psychiatry. In 1991, she was named a University Professor of Social Science, a position that acknowledges distinguished scholars whose work overlaps various disciplines and schools. Dr. Robins had a pivotal role in the development of the field of psychiatric epidemiology. From her classic longitudinal studies of deviant children (Deviant Children Grown Up, Williams & Wilkins, 1966) to the development and implementation of standardized diagnostic instruments, Lee Robins has had a major influence on the entire field of psychiatry and on a generation of psychiatric leaders. Dr. Robins passed away in September 2009.

1991: Dr. C. Robert Cloninger is installed as the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professor in Psychiatry.

After completing his psychiatry residency at Washington University, Dr. Cloninger joined the Department as an assistant professor in 1973. He became a full professor in 1981. He was appointed the Head of the Department in 1989 and led the Department until 1993. In 1991, he was installed as the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professor of Psychiatry. In 1994, he became the Director of the Center for Psychobiology of Personality, and in 2002 he became the Director of the Sansone Family Center for Well-Being.

Between 1941 and 1949, Wallace and Lucille Renard made major gifts to support the missions of the Department of Neuropsychiatry. In addition to general support of the department, these gifts were used to establish the Wallace and Lucille K. Renard Professorship in Psychiatry and to help build Renard Hospital. For a list of Renard Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

1992: Dr. Cloninger officially establishes a Vice-Chair system in the Department. Drs. Theodore Cicero, Richard Hudgens, Theodore Reich, and Eugene Rubin become the first Vice Chairs. Drs. Barry Hong and Charles Zorumski are named Associate Vice Chairs.

Dr. Cloninger formed a Department of Psychiatry Executive Committee in 1989.  In 1992, he officially appointed Vice Chairs. The Executive Committee system and Vice Chair system have been continued by subsequent Heads of the Department.

For a list of vice chairs in the department, click here.

1993: Dr. Samuel Guze becomes Head of the Department for a second time.

Dr. Samuel Guze obtained his MD from Washington University in 1945. He continued his training in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and Washington University, except for a year of medicine training in Connecticut. In 1950, he became a psychosomatic medicine fellow working with Dr. George Saslow. In 1955, Dr. Guze became an assistant professor of psychiatry, with promotion to associate professor in 1959 and full professor in 1964. Along with Eli Robins, Dr. Guze was one of the most influential figures in American psychiatry during the latter part of the 20th century, leading the revolution in criteria-based diagnoses that became DSM-III. He and Dr. Robins also developed criteria for validating psychiatric diagnoses that are still used today. In addition to clinical and research skills, Dr. Guze served Washington University in several major administrative roles. He became the Assistant to the Dean from 1965 to 1971. In 1971, he was appointed the Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs of the Medical School where he oversaw the redevelopment of the Medical Center and the Central West End. In 1975, he also became Head of the Department of Psychiatry. He maintained both positions until 1989 and served as Department Head again from 1993 until 1997. Dr. Guze was the first recipient of the Spencer T. Olin Professorship in Psychiatry. In 1999, he and his family established the Samuel B. Guze Professorship. Dr. Guze passed away in July 2000.

1994: The inpatient psychiatry unit at Jewish Hospital is consolidated with the unit at Barnes Hospital.

Jewish Hospital’s neuropsychiatry group was independent of the Department of Psychiatry at the Medical School until 1976. In the late 1950s, an inpatient adult psychiatry unit and an inpatient child psychiatry unit were opened at JH. The child psychiatry unit closed in 1964. These units were initially run by clinicians with a psychodynamic orientation. Dr. Irwin Levy, a neurologist and psychiatrist, headed the JH neuropsychiatry group from 1953 to 1958. The psychiatry division was subsequently headed by Dr. Alex Kaplan from 1958 to 1966 and Dr. Nathan Simon from 1967 to 1975. JH had its own residency training program until the mid 1970s. Several members of the JH faculty had appointments at St. Louis University. Dr. Harold Wolff served as head of the JH psychiatry department during a transitional year between 1975 and 1976. In 1976, JH contracted with the Washington University Department of Psychiatry, and Dr. Guze appointed Dr. Theodore Reich as Chief of Service. Residents from the department’s residency program and Washington University medical students rotated on the inpatient and outpatient services at JH. Dr. Reich became the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Psychiatry in 1989. He remained Chief of Service at JH until 1994 at which time the inpatient unit at JH was consolidated with the inpatient unit at Barnes Hospital. In 1996, Barnes Hospital and Jewish Hospital consolidated into Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

1994: Dr. Joan Luby becomes the Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Program

Dr. Joan Luby joined the Department in 1990 after completing her general and child psychiatry training at Stanford. She became the associate director of the child and adolescent psychiatry training program in 1990. She became director of the program in 1994 and served in this position until 2005. In 1998, she became the founding director of the Early Emotional Development Program. In 2015, Dr. Luby was installed as the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. She is a pioneer in the description and validation of clinical depression in preschool age children and is an internationally known expert in the developmental psychopathology of depression. 

1995: Dr. Richard Todd is appointed Director of the William Greenleaf Eliot Division of Child Psychiatry and is installed as the Blanche F. Ittleson Associate Professor in Child Psychiatry

Dr. Todd joined the Department as an assistant professor in 1986 after completing his child and adolescent psychiatry training at Washington University. He became a full professor in 1993. Dr. Todd received his MD from the University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio and PhD from the University of Texas – Dallas. In 1995, he was appointed the Director of the Division of Child Psychiatry and installed as the Blanche F. Ittleson Professor in Child Psychiatry. In addition to being a national leader in the field of child and adolescent psychiatry, Dr. Todd was known internationally for his research investigating genetic and environmental influences related to psychiatric illnesses. Dr. Todd passed away in August 2008. For a list of Directors of the Division of Child Psychiatry, click here.

The William Greenleaf Eliot Division of Child Psychiatry was established in 1958. The Division was named after William Greenleaf Eliot, a Unitarian minister in St. Louis during the 19th century.  In addition to being instrumental in the founding of Washington University and Mary Institute, Mr. Eliot also helped create what became the Mission Free School. Donations from the Mission Free School were used to help establish the Division of Child Psychiatry at Washington University.

1996: The Eli Robins Award is established.

The Eli Robins Award was established in 1996 to recognize residents and/or fellows who best exemplify potential for excellence in research, clinical care and teaching.

1996 Chanvit Pornnoppadol, M.D.
1997 Eric Lenze, M.D.
1998 Debra Gusnard, M.D. & Anthony Miller, M.D.
1999 Laura Sherman, M.D.
2000 Daniel Haupt, M.D. & Syed Rizvi, M.D.
2001 Keith Garcia, M.D., Ph.D.
2002 Mehmet Dokucu, M.D., Ph.D.
2003 Dan-Vy Mui, M.D. & John Pruett, M.D., Ph.D.
2004 Li-Shiun Chen, M.D., Sc.D. & Angela Reiersen, M.D.
2005 Jennifer Colvin, M.D., Ph.D. & Peter Fahnestock, M.D.
2006 Ellen Edens, M.D. & Sofia Yahya, M.D.
2007 Ginger Nicol, M.D. & Fay Womer, M.D.
2008 Ottavio Vitolo, M.D.
2009 Mollie Gordon, M.D. & Elise Fallucco, M.D.
2010 Cynthia E. Rogers, M.D.
2011 Akinkunle Owoso, M.D.
2012 Natasha Marrus, M.D., Ph.D.
2013 Chad Sylvester, M.D., Ph.D.
2014 Marie Anne Gebara, M.D.
2015 Adarsh S. Reddy, M.B.B.S., Ph.D.
2016 Alecia Vogel-Hammen, M.D., Ph.D.
2017 Shan Siddiqi, M.B.B.S.
2018 A. Benjamin Srivastava, M.D.
2019 Rita N. Haddad, M.D.

1996: Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center (MPC) opens.

Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute opened in 1938 as a hospital in the St. Louis City hospital system. Washington University psychiatry professor Dr. George Ulett initiated clinical research at Bliss in the 1950s. Dr. Ulett later became director of Missouri’s Division of Mental Disease. In 1964, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center became part of Missouri’s mental health system. In 1991, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center closed. A section of St. Louis State Hospital was temporarily set up to serve patients formerly treated at Malcolm Bliss. In 1996, patients were transferred to a newly built state facility, Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center. Washington University psychiatry residents and medical students rotated at these hospitals throughout much of their history until most inpatient services were discontinued in 2011.

1997: Dr. Charles Zorumski becomes Head of the Department.

Dr. Zorumski joined the department as chief resident and instructor in 1982 after completing his residency at Washington University. He became an assistant professor in 1984 and a professor in 1993. He worked for several years in the laboratory of Dr. Gerald Fischbach studying the physiology of excitatory amino acids. In 1992, he was appointed the Associate Vice Chair for Research. In 1997, he became Head of the Department. He was installed as the first Samuel B. Guze Professor in 1998. For a list of all endowed professors, click here.

1997: Dr. John Feighner makes the commitment to establish the John P. Feighner Professorship in Neuropsychopharmacology.

Dr. John Feighner was a resident and chief resident in the Department. While in the Department, he was the first author of a classic paper published in 1972 that established diagnostic criteria for major psychiatric illnesses. He became president and director of the Feighner Research Institute in San Diego and has made many contributions to the field of neuropsychopharmacology. The Feighner Professorship was established to help the Department maintain exceptional basic and clinical psychiatric research. Dr. John W. Olney was installed as the first Feighner Professor in 1999. For a list of all endowed professorships in the Department, click here.

1997: Drs. Keith Isenberg and Barry Hong become Vice Chairs for Clinical Affairs.

Dr. Keith Isenberg joined the Department as an instructor in 1982 following completion of the Department’s residency program. He became a professor in 2001. Dr. Zorumski appointed him Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs in 1997. Dr. Isenberg retired from the Department in 2006.

Dr. Barry Hong joined the Department as an instructor of medical psychology in psychiatry in 1978. He became a professor in 2001. He was appointed Director of Psychological Services in 1993. From 1992 to 1997, he served as Associate Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs. In 1997, he was appointed a Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs.

Dr. Cloninger formed a Department of Psychiatry Executive Committee in 1989.  In 1992, he officially appointed Vice Chairs. The Executive Committee system and Vice Chair system have been continued by subsequent Heads of the Department.

For a list of vice chairs in the department, click here.

1997: Dr. Wilson Compton becomes director of the Master in Epidemiology in Psychiatry (MPE) Program.

Dr. Wilson Compton obtained his M.D., his psychiatry residency training and his Masters in Psychiatric Epidemiology (MPE) from Washington University. He was appointed chief resident and instructor in 1990, assistant professor in 1992, and associate professor in 1999. Dr. Compton made important contributions to the educational, research, and administrative missions of the Department before leaving in 2002 to become the Director of the Division of Epidemiology, Services and Prevention Research at NIDA (National Institute of Drug Abuse).

The Master of Psychiatric Epidemiology Program was created by Dr. Lee Robins in 1989 to provide research training in psychiatric epidemiology. Dr. Wilson Compton took over the leadership of the MPE program in 1997. Dr. Compton left the University in 2002 for a position at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Linda Cottler took over the leadership of the MPE program after Dr. Compton’s departure. When Dr. Cottler left to become Chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Florida in 2011, Dr. Rumi Price assumed leadership of the program. Over the next several years, Dr. Price successfully transitioned the MPE program to the Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Sciences Concentration in the Master of Population Health Sciences (MPHS) program.

1998: The Samuel B. Guze Professorship in Psychiatry is established in honor of Dr. Samuel Guze and his wife, Joy. Dr. Charles Zorumski is installed as the first Samuel B. Guze Professor.

Dr. Samuel Guze obtained his MD from Washington University in 1945. He continued his training in internal medicine at Barnes Hospital and Washington University, except for a year of medicine training in Connecticut. In 1950, he became a psychosomatic medicine fellow working with Dr. George Saslow. In 1955, Dr. Guze became an assistant professor of psychiatry, with promotion to associate professor in 1959 and full professor in 1964. Along with Eli Robins, Dr. Guze was one of the most influential figures in American psychiatry during the latter part of the 20th century, leading the revolution in criteria-based diagnoses that became DSM-III. He and Dr. Robins also developed criteria for validating psychiatric diagnoses that are still used today. In addition to clinical and research skills, Dr. Guze served Washington University in several major administrative roles. He became the Assistant to the Dean from 1965 to 1971. In 1971, he was appointed the Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs of the Medical School where he oversaw the redevelopment of the Medical Center and the Central West End. In 1975, he also became Head of the Department of Psychiatry. He maintained both positions until 1989 and served as Department Head again from 1993 until 1997. Dr. Guze was the first recipient of the Spencer T. Olin Professorship in Psychiatry. In 1999, he and his family established the Samuel B. Guze Professorship. Dr. Guze passed away in July 2000.

Dr. Zorumski joined the department as chief resident and instructor in 1982 after completing his residency at Washington University. He became an assistant professor in 1984 and a professor in 1993. He worked for several years in the laboratory of Dr. Gerald Fischbach studying the physiology of excitatory amino acids. In 1992, he was appointed the Associate Vice Chair for Research. In 1997, he became Head of the Department. He was installed as the first Samuel B. Guze Professor in 1998. For a list of all endowed professors, click here.

1998: Dr. Theodore Reich is installed as the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Dr. Ted Reich joined the Department as an assistant professor in 1971.  He rose to the level of professor in 1977. He was Head of the Jewish Hospital Department of Psychiatry from 1976 until 1994, when the inpatient service at Jewish combined with the inpatient service at Barnes Hospital.  Dr. Reich subsequently became director of the outpatient psychiatry clinic. In 1989, he was installed as the first Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry. From 1992 until 1998, he served the Department as the Vice Chair for Clinical Research. Dr. Reich was a world leader in the field of psychiatric genetics. He passed away in December 2003.

The Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry was established at Jewish Hospital in 1989. The Ludwigs were active in the Jewish Federation of St. Louis. They were wonderful supporters of Jewish Hospital, and their support continues into perpetuity with their generous gift of an endowed professorship. Following the closure of the Department of Psychiatry at Jewish Hospital, the Ludwig Chair eventually became the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. For a list of Ludwig Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

1999: A training grant is established in "Drug Abuse Comorbidity and Biostatistics."

The Department’s training grants were initially established on the following dates:

1976 – Research Training in Clinical Sciences

1983 – Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics

1991 – Biomedical Training in Drug Abuse

1999 – Drug Abuse Comorbidity and Biostatistics

2005 – Biomedical Training in Alcohol Research

2006 – Indo-US Fogarty Training Program in Behavioral Disorders

2010 – Nutrition-Behavioral Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

1999: The Midwest Alcoholism Research Center is funded by the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

1967    A federally funded Alcoholism Research Center is established in the Department. Dr. Samuel Guze is the principal investigator. This center provided the foundation for the Department’s continued long-term success in alcoholism research.

1972    A federally funded Drug Abuse Research Center is established. Dr. Theodore Cicero is the principal investigator.

1978    A center titled “Models of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Family Resemblance in Psychiatry” is funded. Dr. C. Robert Cloninger is the principal investigator. In 1986, this grant was renamed the “Epidemiological Genetics and Family Study.”

1989    The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is established. Dr. Theodore Reich was a founding member.

1989    The Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program is established and headed by Dr. Lee Robins.

1999    The Midwest Alcoholism Research Center (MARC) is funded. The Department took a lead role in organizing this collaborative project. Dr. Andrew Heath is the first head of the Center. The Center is responsible for the initiation of the annual Samuel B. Guze Symposium in 2001.

2001    The Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders is established in the Department.  Dr. John Csernansky is the first head of this center. The Conte Center is dedicated to the study of schizophrenia and related disorders.

2002    The Sansone Family Center for Well-Being is established. Dr. Cloninger is the first head of this center.

2013    The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research is established with major gifts from Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation. Dr. Charles F. Zorumski is the first director of this institute.

1999: Dr. John Olney is installed as the John P. Feighner Professor in Neuropsychopharmacology.

Dr. John W. Olney trained in the Department’s psychiatry residency program and then stayed on as a member of the faculty. He was appointed an assistant professor in 1969 and advanced to the level of professor in 1977. In 1999, he was installed as the first John P. Feighner Professor in Neuropsychopharmacology. Through his research, Dr. Olney described and defined the importance of a phenomenon that he termed “excitotoxicity.”  Excitotoxicity is a process where excess stimulation by certain brain transmitters leads to cell damage in the central nervous system. Because of his pioneering work, studies involving excitotoxicity have become a central theme in neuroscience. His studies have major implications pertaining to many brain disorders. Dr. Olney died in April 2015.

Dr. John Feighner was a resident and chief resident in the Department. While in the Department, he was the first author of a classic paper published in 1972 that established diagnostic criteria for major psychiatric illnesses. He became president and director of the Feighner Research Institute in San Diego and has made many contributions to the field of neuropsychopharmacology. The Feighner Professorship was established to help the Department maintain exceptional basic and clinical psychiatric research. In 1999, Dr. John W. Olney was installed as the first Feighner Professor. For a list of all endowed professorships in the Department, click here.

2000: BJC Behavioral Health (BJC BH) becomes a training site for the Department’s clinical training programs.

BJC BH provides comprehensive community-based mental health services in St. Louis and surrounding areas. Psychiatric residents and fellows rotate in the outpatient facility in downtown St. Louis and gain valuable experience working with a team model of health care delivery.

2000: Dr. Andrew Heath is installed as the Spencer T. Olin Professor in Psychiatry

Dr. Andrew Heath joined the Department in 1989 as an associate professor. He received his doctoral degree from Oxford in England. He became a full professor in 1996. In 2000, Dr. Heath was named the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Psychiatry. He and his team are international leaders in the field of genetic epidemiology.

Spencer T. Olin and his wife Ann established this professorship in 1974. Mr. Olin served the St. Louis community in a variety of important roles, including Washington University trustee and Barnes-Jewish Hospital board member. In addition to their time and energy, the family has been extraordinarily generous with many important donations to the University over the years. For a list of Olin Professors and other endowed professorships, clinic here.

2001: The Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders is established in the Department with funding from NIMH.

1967    A federally funded Alcoholism Research Center is established in the Department. Dr. Samuel Guze is the principal investigator. This center provided the foundation for the Department’s continued long-term success in alcoholism research.

1972    A federally funded Drug Abuse Research Center is established. Dr. Theodore Cicero is the principal investigator.

1978    A center titled “Models of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Family Resemblance in Psychiatry” is funded. Dr. C. Robert Cloninger is the principal investigator. In 1986, this grant was renamed the “Epidemiological Genetics and Family Study.”

1989    The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is established. Dr. Theodore Reich was a founding member.

1989    The Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program is established and headed by Dr. Lee Robins.

1999    The Midwest Alcoholism Research Center (MARC) is funded. The Department took a lead role in organizing this collaborative project. Dr. Andrew Heath is the first head of the Center. The Center is responsible for the initiation of the annual Samuel B. Guze Symposium in 2001.

2001    The Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders is established in the Department.  Dr. John Csernansky is the first head of this center. The Conte Center is dedicated to the study of schizophrenia and related disorders.

2002    The Sansone Family Center for Well-Being is established. Dr. Cloninger is the first head of this center.

2013    The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research is established with major gifts from Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation. Dr. Charles F. Zorumski is the first director of this institute.

2001: The Peggy Sansone Memorial Lecture is established.

In 2001 and 2002, the Sansone Family established and funded the Peggy Sansone Memorial Lecture and the Sansone Family Center for Well-Being in memory of Peggy Sansone.

Peggy Sansone Memorial Lecturers

2001-2002 C. Robert Cloninger, M.D.
2002-2003 Robert H. Belmaker, M.D.
2003-2004 Anne Farmer, M.D.
2004-2005 Peter Joyce, M.D.
2005-2006 Paula Clayton, M.D.
2006-2007 Juan Mezzich, M.D., Ph.D.
2007-2008 Ada H. Zohar, Ph.D.
2008-2009 Liisa Keltikangas-Jarvinen, Ph.D.
2009-2010 David Goldman, M.D.
2010-2011 Toshinori Kitamura, M.D., Ph.D.
2011-2012 C. Robert Cloninger, M.D.
2012-2013 Hagop Akiskal, M.D.
2013-2014 Trevor Archer, Ph.D.
2014-2015 Roger Mulder, MBChB, Ph.D.
2015-2016 Ada Zohar, Ph.D.
2016-2017 Robert Freedman, M.D.
2017-2018 James Swanson, Ph.D.
2018-2019 Kevin Cloninger, Ph.D.

2001: The Missouri Family Registry, a highly valued research resource, is brought into the Department by Dr. Andrew Heath and his colleagues.

The Missouri twin registry was organized as a research resource in the early 1990s by Dr. Andrew Heath. This was accomplished as part of a center grant dealing with epidemiological genetics. This registry has proven to be an extraordinary resource for genetic epidemiological and other clinical research.

Dr. Andrew Heath joined the Department in 1989 as an associate professor. He received his doctoral degree from Oxford in England. He became a full professor in 1996. In 2000, Dr. Heath was named the Spencer T. Olin Professor of Psychiatry. He and his team are international leaders in the field of genetic epidemiology.

2002: The Sansone Family Center for Well-Being is established and funded.

1967    A federally funded Alcoholism Research Center is established in the Department. Dr. Samuel Guze is the principal investigator. This center provided the foundation for the Department’s continued long-term success in alcoholism research.

1972    A federally funded Drug Abuse Research Center is established. Dr. Theodore Cicero is the principal investigator.

1978    A center titled “Models of Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Family Resemblance in Psychiatry” is funded. Dr. C. Robert Cloninger is the principal investigator. In 1986, this grant was renamed the “Epidemiological Genetics and Family Study.”

1989    The Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) is established. Dr. Theodore Reich was a founding member.

1989    The Master in Psychiatric Epidemiology Program is established and headed by Dr. Lee Robins.

1999    The Midwest Alcoholism Research Center (MARC) is funded. The Department took a lead role in organizing this collaborative project. Dr. Andrew Heath is the first head of the Center. The Center is responsible for the initiation of the annual Samuel B. Guze Symposium in 2001.

2001    The Silvio Conte Center for Neuroscience of Mental Disorders is established in the Department.  Dr. John Csernansky is the first head of this center. The Conte Center is dedicated to the study of schizophrenia and related disorders.

2002    The Sansone Family Center for Well-Being is established. Dr. Cloninger is the first head of this center.

2013    The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research is established with major gifts from Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation. Dr. Charles F. Zorumski is the first director of this institute.

2002: The Department establishes the Resident Invitational Lectureship

The Department Head and Vice-Chair for Education choose speakers from a list of preferred speakers prepared by a committee of psychiatry residents. 

Resident Invitational Lecturers (2002-2010)

Marjorie Frank Lesser Resident Invitational Lecturers (2011-present)

2002-2003 Phillip J. Resnick, M.D., Jonathan D. Cohen, M.D., Ph.D.
2003-2004 Julia K. Warnock, M.D., Ph.D., Charles P. O’Brien, M.D., Ph.D.
2004-2005 Ranga Krishnan, M.B., CH.B., Shitji Kapur, M.D.
2005-2006 David Allison, Ph.D., Glenn Treisman, M.D., Ph.D.
2006-2007 Wayne Drevets, M.D., Zachary Stowe, M.D.
2007-2008 George Murphy, M.D.
2008-2009 None
2009-2010 Paula Clayton, M.D. & William G. Reiner, M.D.
2010-2011 None
2011-2012 Rachel Glick, M.D. and Kimberli McCallum, M.D.
2012-2013 John Rabun, M.D.
2013-2014 Carol North, M.D., M.P.E.
2014-2015 Ramesh Raghavan, M.D., Ph.D.
2015-2016 Mark Gold, M.D.
2016-2017 Daniel R. Weinberger, M.D.
2017-2018 Michael Fox, M.D., Ph.D.
2018-2019 Israel Liberzon, M.D.

2002: Dr. Linda Cottler becomes director of the Master in Epidemiology in Psychiatry (MPE) Program.

Dr. Linda Cottler joined the Department in 1988 as a research instructor of epidemiology in psychiatry after obtaining her Ph.D. in sociology-psychiatric epidemiology from Washington University. She became assistant professor of epidemiology in psychiatry in 1990, associate professor in 1993, and full professor in 1998. She has been recognized with many honors for her important contributions to research, education, public health, and community service. Dr. Cottler left the University in 2011 to become the founding chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Florida.

The Master of Psychiatric Epidemiology Program was created by Dr. Lee Robins in 1989 to provide research training in psychiatric epidemiology. Dr. Wilson Compton took over the leadership of the MPE program in 1997. Dr. Compton left the University in 2002 for a position at the National Institute on Drug Abuse. Dr. Linda Cottler took over the leadership of the MPE program after Dr. Compton’s departure. When Dr. Cottler left to become Chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Florida in 2011, Dr. Rumi Price assumed leadership of the program. Over the next several years, Dr. Price successfully transitioned the MPE program to the Psychiatric and Behavioral Health Sciences Concentration in the Master of Population Health Sciences (MPHS) program.

2004: The Lee Robins Lectureship is established.

Lee Robins Lecturers

2004-2005 Norman Sartorius, M.D.
2005-2006 Darrel Regier, M.D.
2006-2007 Jane Costello, Ph.D.
2007-2008 William W. Eaton, Ph.D.
2008-2009 Terrie Moffitt, Ph.D.
2009-2010 Marc A. Schuckit, M.D.
2010-2011 Cathy Spatz Widom, Ph.D.
2011-2012 John Helzer, M.D.
2012-2013 Felton (Tony) Earls, M.D.
2013-2014 Rolf Loeber, Ph.D.
2014-2015 None
2015-2016 Karestan Koenen, Ph.D.
2016-2017 Madelyn S. Gould, Ph.D.
2017-2018 Enola Proctor, Ph.D., M.S.W.
2018-2019 Nicholas S. Ialongo, Ph.D.

2004: Dr. Alison Goate is installed as the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Dr. Alison Goate joined the Department in 1992 as an associate professor of genetics in psychiatry. She received her doctoral degree from Oxford. She became a professor in 1998 and, in 2004, was named the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Professor of Genetics in Psychiatry. She is a leading expert in the molecular genetics of psychiatric and neurologic illnesses. Her work on the molecular genetics of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias has had major impact in this field. Dr. Goate left the University in 2014 to become the founding director of the Ronald M. Loeb Center for Alzheimer’s Disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai in New York.

The Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry was established at Jewish Hospital in 1989. The Ludwigs were active in the Jewish Federation of St. Louis. They were wonderful supporters of Jewish Hospital, and their support continues into perpetuity with their generous gift of an endowed professorship. Following the closure of the Department of Psychiatry at Jewish Hospital, the Ludwig Chair eventually became the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. For a list of Ludwig Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

2005: A training grant is funded in "Biomedical Training in Alcohol Research."

The Department’s training grants were initially established on the following dates:

1976 – Research Training in Clinical Sciences

1983 – Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics

1991 – Biomedical Training in Drug Abuse

1999 – Drug Abuse Comorbidity and Biostatistics

2005 – Biomedical Training in Alcohol Research

2006 – Indo-US Fogarty Training Program in Behavioral Disorders

2010 – Nutrition-Behavioral Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

2005: The Peter Halstead Hudgens Award is established.

Dr. Richard Hudgens established this award in memory of his son Peter Halstead Hudgens. It is given annually to a medical student who has done excellent work in psychiatry during the pre-clinical and clinical years and includes excellence in research.

2005 Cynthia Rogers
2006 Theodore Satterthwaite
2007 Yelizaveta Sher
2008 Frances Wen-Hui Lee
2009 Chad M. Sylvester
2010 Rebecca Hendrickson
2011 Bradley Miller
2012 Nathaniel Ginder
2013 Alecia Vogel-Hammen
2014 Erin C. Dowd
2015 Marie A. K. Bosch
2016 Emily H. Olfson
2017 Timothy Laumann
2018 Joshua S. Siegel
2019 Anish Mitra

2005: Dr. Anne Glowinski becomes the Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Program

Dr. Glowinski joined the Department in 1998 after completing her general and child psychiatry training at Johns Hopkins. She obtained her Masters in Psychiatric Epidemiology from the Department.  In 2005, she became the Director of the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Training Program.

2006: A training grant entitled "Indo-US Fogarty Training Program in Behavioral Disorders" is funded.

The Department’s training grants were initially established on the following dates:

1976 – Research Training in Clinical Sciences

1983 – Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics

1991 – Biomedical Training in Drug Abuse

1999 – Drug Abuse Comorbidity and Biostatistics

2005 – Biomedical Training in Alcohol Research

2006 – Indo-US Fogarty Training Program in Behavioral Disorders

2010 – Nutrition-Behavioral Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

2006: The Excellence in Teaching Award is established.

Residents and fellows initiated this annual award in 2006 to honor two faculty members (one in general psychiatry and the other in child and adolescent psychiatry) for their excellence in teaching.

2006 Richard Hudgens, M.D. & Gary Boxer, M.D.
2007 Eugene Rubin, M.D., Ph.D. & Anne Glowinski, M.D., M.P.E.
2008 Dan Haupt, M.D. & Joan Luby, M.D.
2009 Melissa Harbit, M.D. & Anne Glowinski, M.D., M.P.E.
2010 Dan Haupt, M.D. & John Constantino, M.D.
2011 Michael Jarvis, M.D., Ph.D., Joan Luby, M.D., & Devna Rastogi, M.D.
2012 Marcia McCabe, Ph.D. & Gary Boxer, M.D.
2013 Nuri Farber, M.D. & T. Eric Spiegel, M.D.
2014 Charles Conway, M.D., Neha Navsaria, Ph.D., & T. Eric Spiegel, M.D.
2015 Akinkunle Owoso, M.D. & T. Eric Spiegel, M.D.
2016 Akinkunle Owoso, M.D. & Paul Glaser, M.D., Ph.D.
2017 Brendan O’Connor, M.D. & Bradley Schlaggar, M.D., Ph.D.
2018 Akinkunle Owoso, M.D. & Neha Navsaria, Ph.D.
2019  Brendan O’Connor, M.D. & Alecia Vogel-Hammen, M.D., Ph.D.

2007: Dr. Nuri Farber becomes Residency Training Director

Dr. Farber joined the Department in 1993 after completing his residency training at Washington University.  He became an assistant professor in 1996, associate professor in 2005, and professor in 2011. From 1996-2007, he was the assistant residency director. In 2007, he became the director of the residency training program.

2007: Dr. Michael Jarvis becomes Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs.

Dr. Michael Jarvis became instructor and chief resident in 1989 after completion of his residency in the Department. He became a full professor in 2006. He was appointed medical director of inpatient psychiatry in 1993. In 2007, he became a Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs.

Dr. Cloninger formed a Department of Psychiatry Executive Committee in 1989.  In 1992, he officially appointed Vice Chairs. The Executive Committee system and Vice Chair system have been continued by subsequent Heads of the Department.

For a list of vice chairs in the department, click here.

2008: Dr. John Csernansky leaves to become chairman of the Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University.

Dr. John Csernansky joined the Department as an associate professor in 1990, and he was named the Gregory B. Couch Associate Professor at that time. He received his MD from NYU and did his residency training in psychiatry at Stanford. He became the Gregory B. Couch Professor of Psychiatry in 1995. He has made substantial contributions in the study of schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. In 2008, Dr. Csernansky left the department to become chairman of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

2008: Dr. John Newcomer is installed as the Gregory B. Couch Professor of Psychiatry.

Dr. John Newcomer joined the department as an instructor in 1990. He received his MD from Wayne State University School of Medicine. Prior to joining the department, he completed his psychiatry residency and a research fellowship at Stanford. He achieved the rank of Professor in the Department in 2005 and was named the Gregory Couch Professor of Psychiatry in 2008. He has been nationally recognized and honored for his work involving the treatment of schizophrenia. Dr. Newcomer left the University in 2011 to become the Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Research and Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Miami.

The family of Gregory B. Couch established this Professorship to honor his memory. They were appreciative of the excellent care Mr. Couch received from Washington University physicians. They also wanted to help advance research pertaining to schizophrenia. In addition to endowing the professorship, family members have generously provided additional research support. For a list of Couch Professors and other endowed professorships in the Department, click here.

2008: The Gene Rubin Award is established.

The Gene Rubin Award was established in 2008 to recognize a psychiatry resident in an early stage of training who demonstrates outstanding potential for an academic career focusing on psychiatric education.

2008 Megan Schabbing, M.D.
2009 Ben Holt, M.D.
2010 Ujjwal Ramtekkar, M.B.B.S.
2011 Luigi Cardella, M.D.
2012 Brendan O’Connor, M.D.
2013 Matthew Perry, M.D.
2014 Naazia Azhar, M.D.
2015 Shan Siddiqi, M.B.B.S.
2016 A. Benjamin Srivastava, M.D.
2017 Max Rosen, M.D.
2018 Fadi Halabi, M.D.
2019 Giuseppe D’Amelio, M.D.

2009: Dr. John Constantino is appointed Director of the William Greenleaf Eliot Division of Child Psychiatry and the Blanche F. Ittleson Professor in Child Psychiatry.

Dr. Constantino joined the Department as an instructor in 1993. He received his MD from Washington University in 1988 and completed his child and adolescent psychiatry training at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He became a full professor in 2009, the same year he was appointed Director of the Division of Child Psychiatry and installed as the Blanche F. Ittleson Professor in Child Psychiatry and Psychiatrist-In-Chief of St. Louis Children’s Hospital. He is an internationally known expert in the field of autism spectrum disorders and has developed new methods and services that engage stressed urban families in interventions that prevent child maltreatment and promote infants’ earliest social attachments. For a list of Directors of the Division of Child Psychiatry, click here.

2010: The James and Philip Brasington Memorial Prize is established

Dr. Rick Brasington and his wife, Kathleen Ferrell, along with his sister, Becky Brasington Clark, established this award to honor the memories of Rick’s son, James, and Rick and Becky’s brother, Philip. The prize is given annually to a medical student who has demonstrated excellent pre-clinical and clinical academic performance in psychiatry and has the potential to make significant contributions to the field.

2010 Rick Schenkelberg
2011 Mary K. Conlon
2012 Colleen E. Donovan
2013 Agnieszka Milczarek & Carrie Morris Mintz
2014 Elizabeth Fenstermacher
2015 Max S. Rosen
2016 Celina R. Jacobi
2017 Giuseppe D’Amelio
2018 Susan Qi Shen
2019 Anastasia B. Evanoff

2010: A training grant entitled "Nutrition-Behavioral Cardiovascular Disease Prevention" is funded.

The Department’s training grants were initially established on the following dates:

1976 – Research Training in Clinical Sciences

1983 – Psychiatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics

1991 – Biomedical Training in Drug Abuse

1999 – Drug Abuse Comorbidity and Biostatistics

2005 – Biomedical Training in Alcohol Research

2006 – Indo-US Fogarty Training Program in Behavioral Disorders

2010 – Nutrition-Behavioral Cardiovascular Disease Prevention

2011: Most inpatient units are closed at Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center (MPC), including those used as training sites for the department’s educational programs.

Malcolm Bliss Psychopathologic Institute opened in 1938 as a hospital in the St. Louis City hospital system. Washington University psychiatry professor Dr. George Ulett initiated clinical research at Bliss in the 1950s. Dr. Ulett later became director of Missouri’s Division of Mental Disease. In 1964, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center became part of Missouri’s mental health system. In 1991, Malcolm Bliss Mental Health Center closed. A section of St. Louis State Hospital was temporarily set up to serve patients formerly treated at Malcolm Bliss. In 1996, patients were transferred to a newly built state facility, Metropolitan St. Louis Psychiatric Center. Washington University psychiatry residents and medical students rotated at these hospitals throughout much of their history until most inpatient services were discontinued in 2011.

2011: Dr. Linda Cottler leaves to become the founding chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Florida.

Dr. Linda Cottler joined the Department in 1988 as a research instructor of epidemiology in psychiatry after obtaining her Ph.D. in sociology-psychiatric epidemiology from Washington University. She became assistant professor of epidemiology in psychiatry in 1990, associate professor in 1993, and full professor in 1998. She has been recognized with many honors for her important contributions to research, education, public health, and community service. Dr. Cottler left the University in 2011 to become the founding chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Florida.

2011: Dr. Deanna Barch is appointed as the Gregory B. Couch Professor of Psychiatry.

Dr. Deanna Barch received her PhD in clinical psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1993. She came to Washington University in 1998 as an assistant professor of psychology in the School of Arts and Sciences. She became an associate professor of psychology, psychiatry, and radiology in 2003 and a professor in 2008. Dr. Barch was named director of the Conte Center for Neuroscience Research at Washington University in 2008, succeeding Dr. John Csernansky. Her research is focused on studying the connections among cognition, emotion, and brain function to better understand the deficits in behavior and cognition found in illnesses such as schizophrenia and depression. Dr. Barch was appointed the Gregory B. Couch Professor in Psychiatry in 2011.

The family of Gregory B. Couch established this Professorship to honor his memory. They were appreciative of the excellent care Mr. Couch received from Washington University physicians. They also wanted to help advance research pertaining to schizophrenia. In addition to endowing the professorship, family members have generously provided additional research support. For a list of Couch Professors and other endowed professorships in the Department, click here.

2012: The Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research is established.

Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation make a $20 million gift to the Department of Psychiatry for the establishment of the Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research. The purpose of the Institute is to facilitate the development of new and more effective treatments for psychiatric disorders. Although research related to neurosteroids is the initial focus for scientists associated with the Institute, the Taylor family’s donation will also be used to support creative, cutting-edge psychiatric brain research for the foreseeable future. The first director of the Taylor Family Institute is Charles F. Zorumski, M.D. For more information about the Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research, go to https://taylorfamilyinstitute.wustl.edu 

2014: Dr. Laura J. Bierut is installed as the first Alumni Endowed Professor in Psychiatry.

Dr. Laura Bierut received her M.D. from Washington University in 1987 and completed her psychiatry residency training at WUMS in 1991. After spending several years at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and the University of Washington in Seattle, she returned to WUMS as an instructor in the Department of Psychiatry. She was promoted to the rank of professor in 2007. Bierut’s research investigates genetic and environmental influences on psychiatric disorders, with a particular emphasis on understanding addiction. For a list of all endowed professorships in the Department, click here.

2014: Dr. Denise Wilfley is installed as the Scott Rudolph University Professor.

Dr. Denise Wilfley received her Ph.D. in counseling psychology from the University of Missouri, Columbia in 1989. After faculty positions at Yale University and San Diego State University/UCSD, she joined the Department of Psychiatry at Washington University in 2002 as associate professor and was promoted to professor in 2003. Dr. Wilfley’s research focuses on examining the causes, prevention, and treatment of obesity and eating disorders. She was installed as the Scott Rudolph University Professor in May 2014.

2015: Dr. Joan Luby is installed as the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.

Dr. Joan Luby joined the Department in 1990 after completing her general and child psychiatry training at Stanford. She became the associate director of the child and adolescent psychiatry training program in 1990. She became director of the program in 1994 and served in this position until 2005. In 1998, she became the founding director of the Early Emotional Development Program. In 2015, Dr. Luby was installed as the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. She is a pioneer in the description and validation of clinical depression in preschool age children and is an internationally known expert in the developmental psychopathology of depression. 

The Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry was established at Jewish Hospital in 1989. The Ludwigs were active in the Jewish Federation of St. Louis. They were wonderful supporters of Jewish Hospital, and their support continues into perpetuity with their generous gift of an endowed professorship. Following the closure of the Department of Psychiatry at Jewish Hospital, the Ludwig Chair eventually became the Samuel and Mae S. Ludwig Chair in Psychiatry at Barnes-Jewish Hospital. For a list of Ludwig Professors and other endowed professorships, click here.

2015: Dr. Theodore Cicero is named the John P. Feighner Professor in Neuropsychopharmacology.

Dr. Ted Cicero joined the Department in 1970 as an assistant professor of psychiatry. He became a full professor in 1978. In 1992, he was appointed to the position of Vice Chair for Research in the department of psychiatry. In 1996, he was appointed to the senior administrative position of Vice Chancellor for Research of Washington University and held that position through 2006. Dr. Cicero’s early research focused on the endogenous opioid system as well as hypothalamic-pituitary functioning. Some of his work helped establish the field of epigenetics – the study of environmental influences on genetic processes. Later in his career, Dr. Cicero studied post-marketing surveillance programs related to the use of opioid medications. This work has led to a better understanding of heroin abuse in various demographic groups. Dr. Cicero was named the John P. Feighner Professor in Neuropsychopharmacology in 2015. 

Dr. John Feighner was a resident and chief resident in the Department. While in the Department, he was the first author of a classic paper published in 1972 that established diagnostic criteria for major psychiatric illnesses. He became president and director of the Feighner Research Institute in San Diego and has made many contributions to the field of neuropsychopharmacology. The Feighner Professorship was established to help the Department maintain exceptional basic and clinical psychiatric research. In 1999, Dr. John W. Olney was installed as the first Feighner Professor. For a list of all endowed professorships in the Department, click here.

2016: Dr. Laura Bierut becomes Vice Chair for Faculty Development.

Dr. Laura Bierut received her M.D. from Washington University in 1987 and completed her psychiatry residency training at WUMS in 1991. After spending several years at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and the University of Washington in Seattle, she returned to WUMS as an instructor in the Department of Psychiatry. She was promoted to the rank of professor in 2007. Bierut’s research investigates genetic and environmental influences on psychiatric disorders, with a particular emphasis on understanding addiction.

Dr. Cloninger formed a Department of Psychiatry Executive Committee in 1989.  In 1992, he officially appointed Vice Chairs. The Executive Committee system and Vice Chair system have been continued by subsequent Heads of the Department.

For a list of vice chairs in the department, click here.

2016: The Center for Brain Research in Mood Disorders is launched.

The Center for Brain Research in Mood Disorders (C-BRiMD) was launched in July 2016 with the support of a $5 million endowment from anonymous donors. The Center unites the efforts of several research groups in the Department of Psychiatry as well as the greater neuroscience community at Washington University to study the biology and treatment of severe mood and anxiety disorders across the lifespan. To develop novel treatments, it is imperative to have a better understanding of the neurobiological basis of these disorders while simultaneously testing promising interventions. C-BRiMD affords university researchers the opportunity to apply such a two-pronged approach to these serious psychiatric disorders. For more information, go to https://mood.wustl.edu/

2017: Dr. Steven Mennerick becomes Vice Chair for Research.

Dr. Steven Mennerick received his Ph.D. in neuroscience from Washington University in 1995. He did postdoctoral fellowships at SUNY Stony Brook and then returned to Washington University as a postdoctoral fellow. He joined the Department of Psychiatry as an assistant professor in 1999 and reached the rank of professor in 2010. He became the scientific director of the Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research at WUMS in 2017. His laboratory studies the mechanisms underlying neuronal excitation and inhibition in the central nervous system.

2018: Dr. Tamara Hershey is installed as the James S. McDonnell Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience.

Dr. Tamara Hershey received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology (neuropsychology track) from Washington University in 1996. Following a postdoctoral fellowship with Dr. Joel Perlmutter at Washington University, she became a clinical supervisor in the Department of Psychology. She joined the Department of Psychiatry as an instructor in 2001 and reached the rank of professor of psychiatry, neurology, and radiology in 2012. Dr. Hershey became Lab Chief of the Neuroimaging Laboratories at Washington University in 2017. She became co-director of the Neuroscience Ph.D. Program in the Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences the same year. In 2018, she became director of the McDonnell Center for Systems Neuroscience. Dr. Hershey’s research interests include the neuropathophysiology underlying cognitive and mood aspects of Parkinson’s disease and other dopaminergic disorders, and the neuropathophysiological and behavioral effects of obesity and diabetes.

2018: The Dr. Adolfo and Fanny Rizzo Endowed Lectureship is established.

Dr. Adolfo Rizzo received his medical school training from the University of Buenos Aires School of Medicine. He came to the U.S. in 1957 and completed residency training at St. Louis State Hospital followed by a child psychiatry fellowship at Washington University. Upon completion of his fellowship, he received a clinical faculty appointment in the Division of Child Psychiatry. Over the next 30 years, Dr. Rizzo enjoyed a successful career in St. Louis, which included clinical instruction, private practice, and administrative positions in private hospitals. He also served as a consultant to the Juvenile Court system for 25 years. Dr. Rizzo passed away in 2015. The Rizzo Lecture is the result of a gift from the family to support education in child psychiatry.

Dr. Adolfo and Fanny Rizzo Lecturers

2018-2019 Joan Luby, M.D.

2019: The Andrew C. and Barbara B. Taylor Distinguished Professorship of Psychiatry is established. Dr. Douglas F. Covey is installed as the first Taylor Distinguished Professor.

In 2012, Andrew and Barbara Taylor and the Crawford Taylor Foundation made a $20 million gift to the Department of Psychiatry for the establishment of the Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research. In 2019, the Taylors and the Crawford Taylor Foundation committed an additional $10 million for the Taylor Family Institute. This gift provided $7 million to support research and $3 million to endow a professorship at the institute. Members of several departments, including psychiatry, anesthesiology, developmental biology, radiology, neurology, and medicine, collaborate on research through the institute. For more information about the Taylor Family Institute for Innovative Psychiatric Research, go to https://taylorfamilyinstitute.wustl.edu/.

Dr. Douglas Covey received his Ph.D. in chemistry from Johns Hopkins University in 1973. He joined the Department of Pharmacology at Washington University in 1977 as an assistant professor. In 1990, he reached the rank of professor in the Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, a predecessor to the present day Department of Developmental Biology. Dr. Covey’s laboratory specializes in natural products chemistry as it relates to the synthesis of steroids and steroid analogues. He has had a particular interest in neurosteroids for several decades, and he has collaborated closely with Dr. Charles Zorumski from the Taylor Family Institute to investigate the potential of these compounds as treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders. For a list of all endowed professorships in the Department, click here.