Education

Psychiatry Residency Research Education Program (PRREP)

Program Highlights

The Psychiatry Residency Research Education Program (PRREP) seeks to provide early training in research to residents in a way that will enhance their ability to be successful at subsequent stages of their career. Approaches from single disciplines have done much to advance science, but technological, methodological, and other scientific advances increasingly require multidisciplinary approaches to address complex questions about mental disorders. Bringing the enormous opportunities and potential of basic science discoveries to psychiatry, requires physician-scientists who can make important diagnostic and therapeutic advances via translational research.The program is designed to continue (for MSTP graduates or similar residents) or begin (for residents who are interested in research as a career but who have not had significant previous experience) the training of future physician-scientists who will accomplish this important and exciting work. PRREP has been structured to provide training across all years to individuals in both the general adult program and the child and adolescent program. The program is composed of two phases.

The first phase of PRREP occurs during PGY1 and 2 and is designed to allow residents to explore the possibility of research as a career option. In addition to mentoring and didactic time, residents will devote 2 of their 11 rotations (approximately 10 weeks or 18% of the year) to research. For those residents with substantial research experience (e.g. MD/PhD) the available PRREP time can be used to address research skill needs and begin their formal research project.

The second phase is a more intensive program that begins in PGY3 and runs the rest of residency training. It is designed for those residents who after Phase 1 have decided to continue pursuing a career in academic psychiatry. This second phase provides for in depth training in research, including a formal research project, career mentoring, and didactics. Residents will have 15% of their 3rd year dedicated to research efforts. Residents staying in the general adult program will then have 8 months of their PGY4 year to finish carrying out their research project. All total adult resident will have 12 months of hands on research time over the four years. Residents, who decide to pursue training in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) at Washington University, can continue to be in PRREP and will have approximately 10 months of dedicated research time spread over their two CAP training years.

Key Elements of PRREP

PGY

Time on Research Rotations

Didactics/Courses/Meetings

Milestones

Phase 1

1

- Monthly advisor and/or mentor meetings

- Weekly Dept research conference

- 10-hour research seminar

- Identify research mentor

- Create career development goals

- Create PGY2 research proposal

2

18% FTE

- Mentor Meetings

- Weekly research conference

- 12-hour research course

- Individualized coursework

- Work on initial career development goals

- Carryout PGY2 research

- Develop initial Phase 2 research proposal

Phase 2

3

15% FTE

- Mentor meetings

- Weekly research conference

- PRREP research seminar

- Individualized coursework

- Modify career development goals and research proposal by end of PGY3

Adult Residents

4

67% FTE

- Mentor meetings

- Weekly research conference

- Leadership course

- Individualized coursework

- Present results at poster and oral sessions

- Publication/presentation of results at meetings

CAP Fellows

4

30% FTE

- Mentor meetings

- Weekly research conference

- Leadership course

- Individualized coursework

- Modify career and research goals as needed

5

50% FTE

- Mentor meetings

- Weekly research conference

- Individualized coursework

- Present results at poster and oral sessions

- Publication/presentation of results at meetings

Monies are made available to participants to support the educational, research, and travel costs associated with the program.

Faculty

For PRREP we have created a core group of faculty advisors and mentors (see Table below) that the majority of participants will likely use for their training. PRREP residents will begin working with one of these individuals during Phase 1 in order to identify an area of research interest and a research project. Trainees might also use one of over 150 university faculty members, who have significant research experience and extramural support in the broad areas of research relevant to psychiatry, as a co-mentor, for their Phase 2 research project. These areas of research include cellular and molecular neuroscience, neurology, psychology, psychiatry, anesthesiology, genetics, epidemiology, and public health.

Core PRREP Faculty

Mentor

Department

Group

Arpana Agrawal

Psychiatry

Genetics#

Deanna Barch

Psychology

Imaging

Laura Bierut

Psychiatry

Genetics

Azad Bonni

Neuroscience

Basic

Michael Bruchas

Anesthesiology

Basic

Patty Cavazos-Rehg

Psychiatry

Genetics

John Constantino

Psychiatry

Clinical

Theodore Cicero

Psychiatry

Basic

Andrew Heath

Psychiatry

Genetics

Tamara Hershey

Psychiatry

Imaging

Eric Lenze

Psychiatry

Clinical

Joan Luby

Psychiatry

Clinical

Steven Mennerick

Psychiatry

Basic

Robi Mitra

Genetics

Basic

Steven Petersen

Neurology

Imaging

John Pruett

Psychiatry

Imaging

Brad Schlaggar

Neurology

Imaging

Paul Taghert

Neuroscience

Basic

Denise Wilfley

Psychiatry

Clinical

Genetics# = Human Genetics, Public Health, Epidemiology

Joining PRREP

PRREP is not a specific training track (with a separate ACGME number) to which applicants must apply prior to joining our program. Rather it is as a two phased training path available to any resident in our program. Residents typically request to join Phase 1 of PRREP in their first year so that they can have the time to meet with a mentor and optimally plan for their second year research rotations. There is no maximum number of residents that can take part in PRREP nor is there a minimum educational requirement. Residents opting to continue into Phase 2 submit a detailed research and career development plan, which has to be approved by the supervising faculty before entering into Phase 2. Applicants to the residency program, who are interested in the PRREP program, are encouraged to indicate such interest at the time they apply so that we can be prepared to discuss the interest during the interview process.